Translation Coincidences

Yeah but what are the odds the Japanese word for karate and the English word for karate would line up like that. It really makes you think that maybe there is a god after all and we all came from the same place.

If that doesn’t convince you, try typing the japanese version, からて, in romaji and see what you get. Think about that for a second

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yeah and then you’ve got stuff like how they say ジェットコースター and we also say jetto kosutaa. Uncanny.

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I’m from Missouri where we just call them zekkyou mashin but I have heard of that regional difference before actually.

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No, we English-speakers get the word for karate from the Japanese. We didn’t develop the word independently.
(Although, on the subject of “maybe we all came from the same place”: We’ve got the words “外人” “goyim” and “gringo”. Words from three unrelated languages, with prominent g and i sounds, all of which mean “foreigner”. Plus a lot of languages use n sounds for negative words, like nyet, no, ない)

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Are you sure? :thinking:

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yes? Even in English it’s the name of the Japanese martial art and not a generic description or something.

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Naruhodo. As we say in English :wink:

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I’ve always liked how 悪かった and “my bad” line up nicely, although, you’d probably have to be a certain age to use the latter. lol

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I find it more strange how few coincidences I can think of, especially phonetically. They seem less common than had they just been randomly chosen (which makes sense, but still).

One thing I just thought of though, is 太字ふとじ’s use of 太 (fat) to indicate boldness, which English doesn’t do, but my native language, Danish, does:
To be fat → at være fed
Bold text → fed tekst

“Fed” can also be used in some ways like the English “awesome,” like in “That was awesome!”

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or konichiwa according to certain WK staff members

just jumping on the bandwagon

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立派 definitely is basically just ripper but what is 突破 equivalent to?

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topper i think

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Just my two cents, I heard karate in english growing up long before I heard 空手 in japanese so I dont think its entirely black and white which word came first. For all we know, the japanese could have used it as a loanword from america, no?

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Aye, that. It’s probably a bit archaic, though.

Maybe you should hang on to your cents before you confuse those poor people any further. :stuck_out_tongue:

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Shut up and take my money

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Please have mercy, I’m just a poor sheep!

As for the thread, I know some of my mnemonics are made up of lucky coincidences (mostly with German words), but I have a hard time finding an example at the moment. I’ll try to post something when I find them again.

Same in French, fat can be literally translated to “gras” (in the case of ‘to be fat’ you would actually say “être gros” more often than “être gras” but both are possible), and bold text is “texte gras” or often times you would just say “gras”.

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I thought of another one. The Danish word for “no” (nej) is almost homophone to ない. It probably looks like it’d be pronounced way differently, but just trust me okay?

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ね used as a sentence ending is pretty similar to Brazilian Portuguese’s né (pronounced Neh). Né is used when you give out some info, and you want confirmation from the other person, similarly to “right?”. Though it’s informal, and a closer translation would probably be “ain’t it?”, since né is a contraction of não é.

So 今日は寒いですね would be translated as Tá frio hoje, né?