'To occupy, しめる' mnemonic

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I hope this is the right place to put this (I thought feedback was a good bet). I’m going to do the usual and just make up a mneumonic myself for this one but I just wanted to highlight that I wasn’t sure the wording made sense. Like, literal sense? I dunno, maybe I’m just not understanding it right :blush: Cheers.

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Agreed, I have no idea what it would mean to occupy a flock of sheep. Maybe to kick them off their pasture and occupy the pasture, that would make more sense.

Well, if you look at the definition of occupy and its synonyms:

Reside or have one’s place of business in (a building).
“the rented flat she occupies in Hampstead”
synonymes : inhabited, lived-in, tenanted, settled

So you would occupy the flock of sheep as in, live in it I guess ?

It’s like Occupy Wall Street but for farm hands.

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Yeah, Koichi sometimes seems to confuse words for other words when making mnemonics. Like, he thinks “attain” and “obtain” are synonyms, for example. (Spoiler: they’re not.)

Maybe it’s definition 2: fill or preoccupy (the mind). What you want most in the whole world is to hold the attention of a flock of sheep.

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69sheep

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what’s the difference between Mick Jagger and a Scotsman?

Mick Jagger sings, “Hey, you, get off of my cloud!”
Whereas the Scotsman goes, “Hey, MacLeod, get off of my ewe!”

:scream_cat:

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occupy definition relevant to this mnemonic: “take control of (a place, especially a country) by military conquest or settlement.”

i’m actually quite surprised this particular definition is 3rd on google/oxford as this is the most immediate definition to me… if it helps, it comes from the latin occupo (literally to seize, to capture) which itself stems from capio (literally to take hold of, capture, captivate)

editing a second time to ping u @plantron since u liked it before i added some actual background instead of just pasting a definition, in case you might be interested :stuck_out_tongue: i also dont know if pings happen for edits so maybe wasting my life who knows

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Except sheep aren’t a place, that’s the issue.

I’m curious as to what the original Charlie Sheen mnemonic was for this…

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i mean, generally with definitions anything parenthetical is a flexible implication, imo… generally maybe it is used with locations but not always. thinking of what it means to occupy a village for example, it certainly would include the physical location itself but also the people, any goods, trade routes, etc would fall under the idea of occupation.

I think this one has always been sheep.

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I’m guessing it’s supposed to mean hold control or have possession of a flock of sheep. Definitely not how the word is usually used.

See definition 3 a

I wonder if it would make more sense with the Japanese word

On that basis, I think the easiest to remember synonym would be “to make up” - as 占い is basically about making things up :joy:
(And yes, I do realise they are quite different meanings of “to make up”)

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Or maybe Koichi meant “occupy” as in “make something into a pie”, i.e., make minced meat out of a flock of sheep and then bake it into a shepherd’s pie.

I’m the “mayor” (める to help distinguish between the fortune meaning) and I occupy thus town with my faithful deputy, Charlie Sheen. I literally dont read the prewritten mnemonics anymore and havent for 15 levels or so, when I started to notice that I was remembering my home cooked ones better. Sheep over cocaine-tripping crazy man don’t do it for me :woman_shrugging:

sheep

When Koichi tells people to occupy your flock.

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