Novice STEM material

Obviously, it is a very premature request at my level, but when everyone is agrees that listening is essential at each level, it mostly advised to stick with general conversations which is fine (ひいきびいき fan here, no idea what they talking about :smile:), but also everyone advises that the topic should be in the vicinity of current interest, so I would be very grateful if some you nice wanikans would offer some beginner’s level audible material on STEM.

For clarification, I believe that with some special vocab training and basic grammar (which in technical subject is usually really basic) one can extract some information from this material in four months if you listen to it as a music.

STEM in general or specifically one of these topics
  • Digital signal processing
  • Quantum programming
  • Stereochemistry
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My best recommendation would be to search for this type of content on Wikipedia, and then check if there’s a Japanese page available for that same concept. Remember that Wikipedia is available in several languages :slight_smile:

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I can’t really help you with the specific topics you’re looking for, but if anyone is looking for more basic science discussion / science related questions from children being answered by scientists, I really like the NHK 子ども科学電話相談 series.
https://www.nhk.or.jp/radio/ondemand/detail.html?p=2039_00

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Looks like it would be good to outweigh the fear of JP Wiki. Maybe after tenth level alright :slightly_smiling_face:

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I know I’m not helping much here but I also highly suggest that you watch stuff rather than just listen to it. Giving your brain something to see while people are talking can help with understanding of words. If you’re going straight into podcasts and radio stations my thought is that it’s going to be really hard to stay focused on listening, and you’re not going to benefit that much since you have zero clue of what they are saying. When you’re watching you still won’t know what they’re saying (most likely), but you now have visual queues that can help your brain slowly put together what is going on and help with the language development. Just my advice though, listening no matter what is going to help in the long run though.

Also, keep in mind I have about 250 hours of active listening (watching japanese content without subs) and I don’t think I would have close to that if I was just listening to podcasts or radio stations.

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It reasonable but watching and listening or only listening on my level might have same impact whilst audio can be everywhere with me that’s why I’m looking for audio and not some yt videos for example.

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Oh yeah, I see what you mean. I forgot to take into account that you’d most likely be using this other than at home. Sorry, I don’t have any material on STEM; however, you can check japanesepod101 out though if you’d like. I believe they have a great section to choose from, and you can also listen to their audio lessons that teach you Japanese so you can download that and listen to it in the car, or wherever. Also, I listen to some beginner level stuff (probably not in your interest) on Spotify. A fairly easy one that I like is “Thinking in Japanese Podcast” by Iisaku.

Also, if you do have time though I suggest you sit down and watch since actively listening is a lot more beneficial than passive listening. But I understand we all have different schedules and it can be hard to implement that stuff.

Anyways, hope that helps :slight_smile:

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Can’t really help you, sorry. I’m just wandering why are you interested specifically in stereochemistry and not in something like organic chemistry in general?

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I like this YouTube channel’s playlist:
Let’s learn what you already know in Japanese. It covers basic maths like arithmetic, decimal, fraction and geometry, and there is subtitles in Japanese and English.

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Japanese Khan Academy has some material on basic physics and basic algebra.

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Giving you the fish:
Digital signal processing seems to be デジタル信号処理. Keio University seems to have a playlist on it:

Quantum programming seems to be 量子コンピュータ. Again Keio has a playlist on it:

Stereochemistry seems to be 立体化学. I found this channel which has many videos on chemistry and some on stereochemistry.

Teaching you how to fish
All I did was lookup what each of the terms are in Japanese and searched them on YouTube or googled them. :stuck_out_tongue:
I’ve looked up academic stuff in Japanese in the past as well and there’s a ton of channels just filled with knowledge.

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Stereochemistry is something that interests me particularly now, I have some practical experience in organic chemistry and the basic polarimeter is very easy to construct with some optical equipment from a photographic hobby. In a way, the concept of spatial isomerism has fascinated me for a long time.

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Looks promising, thank you.

I knew about online educational platforms like Khan Academy, but never thought about their multilanguage materials, duh. That’s a very solid advice, thank you.

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I tried to write my bio lecture in as much japanese as I could write. I quickly stopped after not knowing what the word “cell” was. I’ve never been so quickly shot down in my life. Mind you it was a cell biology course.

BTW it’s 細胞(さいぼう)

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Follow up post, Biology is a word heavy language too so japanese courses in middle school biology terms would be helpful as well!

Well it obviously was a brave but a bit early for that.

I was feeling a little bit adventurous about Japanese at that time and wanted to sprinkle in some terms, figured it could help

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Looks like it certainly can at least help to explore some biology vocab. It seems that in each language scientific conversation is so specific that it is hard for any non-native speaker (source: I can have some casually-not-even-very-scientific talk about microbiology at some amateur level, but not in English for example).

It’s wasn’t particularly hard, I’m guess. It’s ok to stick to the audio from the yt videos for now, thank you for you help, especially for quantum programming playlist which is completely mindblowing topic beyond human logic.

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