My reason for quitting WK (no, not because of the reviews or the common reason)

Also, children at a young age soak up language much better than adults.

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Unrelated, but happy cake day!

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I’m not saying you’re wrong. But for me personally, there is no unnecessary vocabulary. I want to learn as much as possible. It doesn’t matter how rare or outdated they are.

Unfortunately, I don’t have the required resources. I don’t have all Japanese environment to be 24 hours in Japanese. I don’t have 10+ years of learning Japanese daily everyday like new born childs. So…

And the arguement you’ve made about reading manga and watching anime is really odd for me. The vocab wanikani have been teach me so far are very basic and it still doesn’t cover most of the vocab I need to know in Shonen manga. Especially manga on twitter, that don’t have furigana on them. And if you are in Wanikani for watching anime …what? It’s like you went to an Italian restaurant and order a Chinese food.

I’m self studying and I use systematic structure because it could save my precious limited self-study time.

As I mentioned above I understand why you are quiting Wanikani and you are not wrong. However, for me it’s like you went to an Italian restaurant and expecting a good Ramen. Wanikani is for teaching Kanji not anything else. Vocab is just like the cherry on top. So it’s good for you that you realize this is an Italian restaurant not a Ramen restaurant before you made any more order.

All that have been said. It’s your decision and I wish you the best on your Japanese learning journey.

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Honestly wanikani is good but what sells it to me is the community. Yeah jisho is fine but I can’t ask jisho weird obnoxious japanese question that leebo will answer in 34 seconds flat.

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The point I will agree on is that I do think one of WK’s shortcomings (there aren’t many for me) is that because kanji are taught in order from simplest to most complex, I find myself missing out on kanji that realistically I would be exposed to much, much earlier in any other Japanese content. So by the time I hit that particular kanji with WK, it’s like okay well I learned that three months ago in Lesson 3 of Genki, so now it’s just pointless and taking up a review spot.

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Some people argue this is not true and the elasticity of the brain never decreases. I can 100% attest it is true. It happened to me.

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Actually @Leebo also answers questions on Jisho, I think.

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Indeed. Reaction time is typically slower though since Jisho can’t tell you when a new post has appeared.

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i really want to reiterate what you a said about kids making mistakes.

people aren’t wrong that kids pick up languages different then adults do but i think a lot of people almost give kids too much credit when it comes to learning a language. I don’t hang around kids too often since i don’t go to school nor have a kid, but the few times i am around kinds even around the 3-4 year mark kids say things that are: strange, grammatically wrong, simple, or just flat out don’t make any sense AT ALL. sure they probably understand the world around them more then what they can speak so maybe that’s something that makes kids very smart in terms of a language BUT something as adults even as a self learner is that we have at least a better chance of finding resources and understanding those resources that teach us what we are doing wrong. The things an adult can say can come across as clunky and strange but most times when adults say things wrong in a second language i’ve at least noticed that most times its a lot more understandable, just not what my brain would expect, if that makes sense.

So yeah exposing yourself to your target language is still super important but immersion isn’t something we need to do 24/7 nor should it be the “only” thing we do in our self studies i think. We aren’t infants (at least i don’t think any of you are stares) so we shouldn’t be valued as infants. “brute forcing” it like you said is hypothetically possible but would likely be a very painful learning process.

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This isn't quite the same as you're talking about, but...

…I’ve analyzed subtitles for some anime I’ve seen, and well as a few non-anime sources, and one of things I look at is how many of WaniKani’s overall vocabulary appears in each.

It’s the two columns on the right in this image:

What this says, for example, is that in the anime “Ao Haru Ride”, 730 of WaniKani’s 6,372 vocabulary words appear. This means 11.5% of WaniKani’s vocabulary appear in the anime.

The much longer Cardcaptor Sakura includes 25.3% of the words taught by WaniKani.

The video game Chrono Trigger comes in at 10.7%, but that’s because the series makes very light use of kanji, and my analysis doesn’t count non-kanji versions of words WaniKani teaches. If I did, the number for Chrono Trigger would be higher.

Note that these WaniKani numbers count only unique words. Some words WaniKani teaches may appear over 50 times in a series, and others may appear only one time.

The conclusion one can draw from this is that indeed WaniKani isn’t the best source if all you want to do is watch anime and read manga in the same genre as I do.

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This assumes though that the benefit of using WaniKani is that you’ll know enough words to read something after using WK. It’s just not what they ever set out to do. You will know the kanji and be able to guess a lot of readings for words you don’t know, which is a huge quality of life improvement for reading.

This isn’t like English where there is “you don’t know a word” and “you do know a word.”

In Japanese you have

-Don’t know a word and can’t even try to say it
-Can read the pronunciation but don’t know the meaning
-Can guess the meaning but don’t know the reading
-Can guess both the reading and meaning but aren’t sure of the meaning
-(Probably other gray areas as well)
-You know the word already

WaniKani brings your ability to already be at those intermediate stages for new words much higher. The fact that you didn’t already know the words doesn’t mean you are equally as “unknowledgeable” as someone who hadn’t done WK (or other studying, let’s just say) at all.

I realize you’re not arguing against using WK, I just wanted to articulate that thought.

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I was thinking of it the other way around, that 50 to 75% of what I’m learning from WaniKani never shows up in anything I read/watch. Thus, I’m learning a lot of words that I’ll just forget after burning them.

As you say, I’m not arguing against using WaniKani for people who only watch/read what I do. And I agree completely with what you wrote.

Edit: Also, considering frequency of words, there are so many words I’ve learned from WaniKani that I do encounter when reading manga, and that’s really boosted my reading ability.

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Also, I think the conclusion about Wanikani’s usefulness is weakened by the lack of a totals column for the Wanikani side of the graph.

If there’s low percentages, but also low overlap, that’s still a great source! And with the nature of vocabulary the overlap definitely isn’t going to be 100%, so the per-source percantages seem like they would make it look worse to me.

That conclusion specifically seems too hasty unless I’m misreading the graph.

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I suppose, but correct me if I’m wrong, but then you aren’t necessarily accounting for things like… 食べはじめる, which you can definitely read and probably guess the meaning after WaniKani, but that won’t have counted as a match for 食べる or はじめる potentially, and you did in fact reinforce those words you learned on WK even if they never appeared in their base forms.

Or let’s say WaniKani has 夕刊 and 食事 and those words never appeared in your manga, but 夕食 did, which isn’t on WaniKani. WaniKani would definitely help you read that word, and the two words that weren’t seen in the manga were reinforced indirectly.

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Since I'm getting off-topic, I'm hiding this behind a details tag.

I agree. I’ve been meaning to add one, but I’m lazy. I am curious on the overall, but haven’t gotten to adding it.

As per my edit on my last comment, I’m always encountering words in reading manga that I learned from WaniKani, and each level introduces many more words that come up.

The numbers are also a bit misleading because they’re only intended to say what percent of WaniKani’s words appear in the anime. They’re not intended to say what percent of the anime’s words (frequency) are covered by WaniKani.

I can’t really make the conclusion without that overall number, but if I were to (just for example) only watch Cardcaptor Sakura, and I completed WaniKani through level 60, I would encounter only 25.3% of the words I learned in WaniKani. The other 74.7% of words from WaniKani would never come up. (This is a completely unrealistic situation, but just to give an idea of what the percentage is saying.)

Again, the overall number is necessary to draw any real conclusions, because the overlap from one series to the next is unknown.

You are absolutely correct.

In fact, a lot of my Anki cards I’ve made from manga I’m reading are specifically cards that utilize kanji I learned from WaniKani, but are vocabulary not covered by WaniKani.

If you guys want a guide for Japanese Media content check out TheMoeWay (learnjapanese.moe)

IMO, got the best advice regarding this. And yes, I’m on similar position but I’d at least go further more in wanikani up until level30 probably (I’m on annual). Because I still want to be fluent not only for media but for everything. But at that point, I can self sustain myself, with the help of Radicals that I’ve learned. (Yes I’m lazy to RTK and money’s not a problem)

I’m already immersing myself through Visual Novel.

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Honestly I think it’s totally on-topic, since one of the original poster’s key reason’s for leaving was a low estimated percentage of words appearing in anime and manga they wanted to watch.

I’ve got a very… poorly-formed idea of what all I want to read, so I think I’ve done a bad job empathizing with the use-case of having a very specific scope, like the graph is meant to target, or the extreme “one manga series and done forever” example, or the motivation behind threads like these.

I think in retrospect that might have been what they were getting at with the “live in Japan” vs. “read manga” split - picturing a broad set of applications in daily life vs. a very specific use case of the manga they wanted to read.
Which explains why I had such a surprised reaction - there’s a lot of manga I want to read on a lot of subjects! From basketball to history to surgery to geology. “manga and anime” doesn’t sound like a limited slice to me at all!

So genuinely thanks for helping me see that! I see the logic better now I think.

(I still have qualms with it, but I’m struggling to put them into words and I’m not sure how much is sill informed by bias about my own situation, so I’ll leave it at that!)

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Do you account for words written in kana but that WK teach in kanji ? Because when I check with koohi.cafe (I created a fresh account and set the WK level to 60) the result are so widely different that I’m a bit confused. For anime the percentage of know words is around 40% to 50%.

gory details dump

Made in Abyss: Dawn of the Deep Soul - Vocabulary List
50.9% |
Vol. 2 |
Made in Abyss: Dawn of the Deep S…
Made in Abyss - Vocabulary List
47.4% |
Vol. 1 |
Made in Abyss
Kumo Desu ga, Nani ka? - Vocabulary List
40.3% |
Vol. 1 |
Kumo Desu ga, Nani ka?
Basilisk - Vocabulary List
38.8% |
Vol. 1 |
Basilisk
Adachi to Shimamura - Vocabulary List
45.8% |
Vol. 1 |
Adachi to Shimamura
Majutsushi Orphen Hagure Tabi - Vocabulary List
46.6% |
Vol. 1 |
Majutsushi Orphen Hagure Tabi
Pokemon (2019) [1-60] - Vocabulary List
45.5% |
Vol. 1 |
Pokemon (2019) [1-60]
Toaru Kagaku no Accelerator - Vocabulary List
41.5% |
Toaru Kagaku no Accelerator
Toaru Kagaku no Railgun - Vocabulary List
38.1% |
Toaru Kagaku no Railgun
Sailor Moon Crystal [1-13] - Vocabulary List
45.1% |
Vol. 1 |
Sailor Moon Crystal [1-13]
Yuru Yuri [1-13] - Vocabulary List
45.4% |
Vol. 1 |
Yuru Yuri [1-13]
Carole and Tuesday [1-13] - Vocabulary List
41.2% |
Vol. 1 |
Carole and Tuesday [1-13]
Gotoubun no Hanayome - Vocabulary List
44.6% |
Vol. 1 |
Gotoubun no Hanayome
Horimiya (Ongoing) - Vocabulary List
ongoing49.2% |
Vol. 1 |
Horimiya (Ongoing)
Mushoku Tensei (Ongoing) - Vocabulary List
ongoing48.6% |
Vol. 1 |
Mushoku Tensei (Ongoing)
Yuru Camp S2 (Ongoing) - Vocabulary List
ongoing45.5% |
Vol. 2 |
Yuru Camp S2 (Ongoing)
Domestic na Kanojo - Vocabulary List
45.7% |
Vol. 1 |
Domestic na Kanojo
Jujutsu Kaisen 1-17 - Vocabulary List
39.5% |
Vol. 1 |
Jujutsu Kaisen 1-17
Kimetsu no Yaiba - Vocabulary List
44.2% |
Vol. 1 |
Kimetsu no Yaiba
Tower of God - Vocabulary List
43.5% |
Vol. 1 |
Tower of God
Charlotte - Vocabulary List
41.9% |
Vol. 1 |
Charlotte
Natsume’s Book of Friends - Vocabulary List
36.1% |
Vol. 1 |
Natsume’s Book of Friends
Kimi ni Todoke - Vocabulary List
48.9% |
Vol. 1 |
Kimi ni Todoke
Higurashi no Naku Koro ni Gou - Vocabulary List
40.3% |
Vol. 1 |
Higurashi no Naku Koro ni Gou
The God of High School - Vocabulary List
45.0% |
Vol. 1 |
The God of High School
Ano Natsu de Matteiru - Vocabulary List
45.7% |
Vol. 1 |
Ano Natsu de Matteiru
Great Pretender - Vocabulary List
40.1% |
Vol. 1 |
Great Pretender
Deca-dence - Vocabulary List
44.0% |
Vol. 1 |
Deca-dence
Tatami Galaxy - Vocabulary List
37.9% |
Vol. 1 |
Tatami Galaxy
Neon Genesis Evangelion 1995 - Vocabulary List
37.8% |
Vol. 1 |
Neon Genesis Evangelion 1995
Vinland Saga - Vocabulary List
39.0% |
Vol. 1 |
Vinland Saga
To Aru Majutsu no Index - Vocabulary List
38.1% |
Vol. 1 |
To Aru Majutsu no Index
Kiki’s Delivery Service - Vocabulary List
55.1% |
Vol. 1 |
Kiki’s Delivery Service
Hataraku Saibou - Vocabulary List
43.7% |
Vol. 1 |
Hataraku Saibou
Free - Vocabulary List
44.0% |
Free
Flying Witch - Vocabulary List
49.2% |
Vol. 1 |
Flying Witch
Bungou Stray Dogs - Vocabulary List
33.7% |
Vol. 1 |
Bungou Stray Dogs
Otome Game no Hametsu Flag - Vocabulary List
45.2% |
Vol. 1 |
Otome Game no Hametsu Flag
Yesterday wo Utatte - Vocabulary List
45.4% |
Vol. 1 |
Yesterday wo Utatte
BNA - Brand New Animal - Vocabulary List
42.9% |
Vol. 1 |
BNA - Brand New Animal
Kaguya-sama wa Kokuhakusaretai - Vocabulary List
39.8% |
Vol. 1 |
Kaguya-sama wa Kokuhakusaretai
The Garden of Words - Vocabulary List
53.5% |
Vol. 1 |
The Garden of Words
FLCL - Vocabulary List
46.8% |
Vol. 1 |
FLCL
Tokyo Ghoul - Vocabulary List
46.6% |
Vol. 1 |
Tokyo Ghoul
Paprika - Vocabulary List
45.6% |
Vol. 1 |
Paprika
Beatless[1-20] - Vocabulary List
36.9% |
Vol. 1 |
Beatless[1-20]
Somali and the Forest Spirit - Vocabulary List
47.1% |
Vol. 1 |
Somali and the Forest Spirit
Shirobako - Vocabulary List
36.5% |
Vol. 1 |
Shirobako
Black Fox - Vocabulary List
53.0% |
Vol. 1 |
Black Fox
Eromanga Sensei - Vocabulary List
43.9% |
Vol. 1 |
Eromanga Sensei
Ore no Imouto ga Konnani Kawaii Wake ga Nai - Vocabulary List
41.7% |
Vol. 1 |
Ore no Imouto ga Konnani Kawaii W…
Barakamon - Vocabulary List
44.6% |
Vol. 1 |
Barakamon
Shinchou Yuusha - Vocabulary List
40.8% |
Vol. 1 |
Shinchou Yuusha
Yakusoku no Neverland - Vocabulary List
46.9% |
Vol. 1 |
Yakusoku no Neverland
Beastars - Vocabulary List
44.4% |
Vol. 1 |
Beastars
Attack on Titan - Vocabulary List
41.5% |
Vol. 1 |
Attack on Titan
Kishuku Gakkou no Juliet - Vocabulary List
42.1% |
Vol. 1 |
Kishuku Gakkou no Juliet
Mahou Shoujo Madoka Magica - Vocabulary List
44.7% |
Vol. 1 |
Mahou Shoujo Madoka Magica
Sangatsu no Lion - Vocabulary List
44.2% |
Vol. 1 |
Sangatsu no Lion
Haikyuu - Vocabulary List
45.7% |
Vol. 1 |
Haikyuu
Akame ga Kill - Vocabulary List
41.5% |
Vol. 1 |
Akame ga Kill
High Score girl - Vocabulary List
38.8% |
Vol. 1 |
High Score girl
Boku no Hero Academia [1-13] - Vocabulary List
40.2% |
Vol. 1 |
Boku no Hero Academia [1-13]
Gosick [1-13] - Vocabulary List
44.3% |
Vol. 1 |
Gosick [1-13]
Noragami [1-12] - Vocabulary List
44.0% |
Vol. 1 |
Noragami [1-12]
Megalo Box [1-13] - Vocabulary List
41.4% |
Vol. 1 |
Megalo Box [1-13]
Princess Pretty Cure [1-12] - Vocabulary List
45.2% |
Vol. 1 |
Princess Pretty Cure [1-12]
Shigatsu wa Kimi no Uso [1-22] - Vocabulary List
41.5% |
Vol. 1 |
Shigatsu wa Kimi no Uso [1-22]
Little Witch Academia [1-25] - Vocabulary List
39.8% |
Vol. 1 |
Little Witch Academia [1-25]
Boku Dake ga Inai Machi [1-13] - Vocabulary List
46.5% |
Vol. 1 |
Boku Dake ga Inai Machi [1-13]
Aikatsu! [1-12] - Vocabulary List
42.6% |
Vol. 1 |
Aikatsu! [1-12]
Violet Evergarden [1-13] - Vocabulary List
47.4% |
Vol. 1 |
Violet Evergarden [1-13]
Mononoke Hime - Vocabulary List
51.5% |
Vol. 1 |
Mononoke Hime
Yagate Kimi ni Naru - Vocabulary List
51.2% |
Vol. 1 |
Yagate Kimi ni Naru
Koe no Katachi [Experimental Rip] - Vocabulary List
53.5% |
Vol. 1 |
Koe no Katachi [Experimental Rip]
Banana Fish - Vocabulary List
40.9% |
Vol. 1 |
Banana Fish
Kino no Tabi [1-12] - Vocabulary List
47.6% |
Vol. 1 |
Kino no Tabi [1-12]
SSSS Gridman - Vocabulary List
48.0% |
Vol. 1 |
SSSS Gridman
Hibike Euphonium [1-13] - Vocabulary List
44.0% |
Vol. 1 |
Hibike Euphonium [1-13]
Jojos Bizarre Adventure Stardust Crusaders [1-24] - Vocabulary List
36.5% |
Vol. 1 |
Jojos Bizarre Adventure Stardust …
Tsuredure Children - Vocabulary List
46.5% |
Vol. 1 |
Tsuredure Children
Gochuumon wa Usagi Desu ka - Vocabulary List
44.1% |
Vol. 1 |
Gochuumon wa Usagi Desu ka
Chuunibyou demo Koi ga Shitai - Vocabulary List
44.6% |
Vol. 1 |
Chuunibyou demo Koi ga Shitai

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My text analysis specifically does not match on WaniKani-covered words that appear as kana-only (due to laziness on my part). (I mentioned this in one of my jumble of comments, but I don’t recall which one…) Maybe that should be one of my future update to my scripts (except, I’m lazy, so…)

I disagree on the immersion part where immersion ought to completely be in Japanese. Maybe after one has reached the advanced stage, then you could argue that immersion should completely be in Japanese to advance even further and understand all the nitty-gritty bits of Japanese.

But if one is still a beginner or on the lower intermediate spectrum, there is no reason not to use English dictionaries or find the definitions of words in English. You say that Japanese kids got to where they are by immersing themselves completely in Japanese. Well, that’s also because growing up, they had adults to demonstrate what the words mean. For example, how does a toddler know the term 「くれる」by the time they are 4? They probably see their parents saying [くれる」whenever they hand each other something and they get trained by their parents to utilise that word properly.

For many learners, they don’t have the luxury of having native Japanese people surrounding them all the time to completely guide them in learning Japanese. I presume many of us here are students or workers anyway, it is impossible to completely immerse ourselves in Japanese in our daily lives unless we live in Japan. Looking up the meanings of Japanese words in English helps to ameliorate the process.

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