JLPT 2019!

That sounds nicely manageable and motivating indeed. Thanks again for the recommendation, I’m looking forward to it being delivered in a week or so.

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I wasn’t the one who recommended it, but this books has been recommended several times on the forums by different people, including me, so at least it seems to have worked for many people :slight_smile:

Enjoy when it arrives!!

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ありがとう!(⌒▽⌒)

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Image I made to commemorate the last time I sat for it. What a stag-mire that year was.
jlpt2016

I’m signed up for N4 this summer, taking it in Okinawa. I’ll also be taking Kanken 8kyuu this summer.

I only attempted JLPT once, a couple years ago, and failed N4. It’s way past time I take this more seriously and take steps forward, though.

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If you’re interested, share your experience in the Kanken thread :slight_smile:

Anyone tried Kanken?

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Just moved to Japan last month. Was hoping to take the N2 this summer, but I failed the N3 back home in December :frowning_face: and by just 2 points :skull:

Retaking the N3 because I really want that credential in case I need a new job! If all goes as planned I can move on to N2 in December :pray:

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I took a look at N5 just to get an idea of what the tests look like. The Kanji are easy to translate but except for that part I understood maybe 30% of the rest :sweat_smile: back to studying

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That is exactly my plan as well!
We can do this :muscle:

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I’m hoping to try my hand at N5 in December (only option where I live). I’m pretty sure I can get to grips with the vocab and grammar as well as the Kanji (pretty sure I have most of the Kanji at my WK level), but all this talk of how the audio portion works makes me nervous. I’m hoping to get a tutor on italki soon, so that should help.

One thing I’m struggling with is books. Every N5 book I’ve found is either just a vocab/grammar list or entirely in Japanese. I get that the test is in Japanese, but when learning you at least need a foot in the door!

I’m working my way through 80/20 Japanese, but does anyone know a good book to take you through what you need to know for N5 that isn’t just lists?

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Nice! Yeah, we got this! :metal:

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I quite like the Genki books. If you complete Genki I, you should be in good shape for N5. (Likewise, Genki II roughly covers the contents of N4.)
Grammar-wise, that is. For vocab, you may want to look into Anki or some other SRS that comes with vocab lists.
For listening, you can find old tests on YouTube (search for JLPT N5 Listening).

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You could always check learned grammar off on https://bunpro.jp/ to make sure you’ve learned everything you need.
Genki I gets you pretty close to N5 in terms of grammar, but it’s still missing quite a few. Then again, it’s probably enough to pass.

I wouldn’t worry so much about the N5 listening section, you definitley won’t need an italki tutor if it’s only for that.
jtest4you is plenty of practice and if you actually worked through all that you can always pick up a listening exercise book like Japanese by Ear or everyday listening if you still feel like you need to.
People saying that the JLPT listening section is rough are most likely talking about higher grades.

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Thanks @NicoleRauch and @GrumpyPanda!

I’m doing bunpro, so that’s something. I’m hesitant with Genki because of the price, but I guess I should just bite the bullet at some point! I’ll definitely also look into those listening books and jtest4you. Never heard of that before.

The italki tutor is actually mainly because I need to put into practice what I’m learning. I need to speak and listen, so I think that’s the best way for me at the moment.

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Getting an italki tutor is something I can really recommend. However, I would not rely on it for listening practice since you will be used to the way your tutor speeks and they will adjust to your level.
I would rather recommend listening to the CDs that come with text books, JLPT practice books and graded readers. There are also JLPT sample exams on youtube that you can find easily.

I’m planning on using WaniKani, JALUP (plus suggested immersion techniques), and a JLPT study book to study for the N3 this year.

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I’ve been tossing around the idea of taking the JLPT in December this year as well, more as a way to gauge my progression and another motivational factor to continually study Japanese.

I find even if I take only a week or two break in between studying grammar, I regress a lot :’(

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About the same here. I don’t really need the JLPT for anything. It’s more of a personal challenge.

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By the way, is anybody taking the JLPT in July in Düsseldorf and would like to meet fellow WKers in real life? We’re already a small group, so the more the merrier!

We also plan on getting some nice Japanese food as a reward / consolation afterwards, depending on how things went ^^ - so if you want to join that as well, I’d be more than happy!

Just ping me in here for either or both, so that I can try to keep track :wink:

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Good to know I’m not alone!

@NicoleRauch what a good idea, I wish I lived there so I could join!

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