How do I know if a vocabulary meaning for a kanji is kunyomi or onyomi when it's alone?

For example if 人 is alone how do I know if it’s ひと or じん?

Usually when there is one kanji alone it is kunyomi, but there are quite a few exceptions… :smiley: At least that´s what i´ve seen so far.

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I feel it’s pretty safe to say that a Kanji alone uses the Kunyomi… Things get weird in compounds, often enough every part uses Onyomi, but there can be wild mixes, total exceptions, all Kunyomi in a compound etc. :smiley:

Yeah but then kanji like 園 (えん) happen :smiley: or when kanji does not have kunyomi like 席 (せき) . But yeah mostly kunyomi

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The kun’yomi for 園 is その

The kun’yomi for 席 is むしろ

WaniKani only teaches the most common readings. :wink:

Well then, i was mistaken that it does not have one, but still, they use onyomi reading when standing alone :grin:

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Aye, for sure. My guess is that the on’yomi words, 公園 and 座席, are used so frequently that they just shorten it to 園 and 席.

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Worst part of Wanikani:

New vocabulary item and it says “you learned the reading already” … and then it is the other one of the bold two, that you did not memorize before -.-

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yep ! so true. haha

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The reading of the purple vocabulary cards is the reading that you’ll use if you encounter that particular vocabulary in the real world. Instead of trying to learn “oh, 人 uses kun’yomi, and that’s ひと”, you should just eliminate the middleman and learn that as a vocabulary word, 人 is ひと.

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