When should I start over?

Oh, wanikani, how I long for you, and yet torment myself over your knowledge!


I still wanna start over, this time around using Kamesame simultaneously, but I think, after reading what everyone here thinks, I may indeed simply wait until I finish my lessons and reviews.

Thanks, everyone, for your help with this. If anyone has any other advice, regarding good ways to study hardcore for the N2 exam over the course of a year, or on studying in general, or using Wanikani, I’d love to hear of it!

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Do you need to start over? Can’t you unburn the kanji from the 20 levels?

I suppose I could; I’ve never unburnt anything before. Does it add it as a new lesson, and you start it as an apprentice, or does it just go down to guru?

Not a new lesson, but it goes back to Apprentice I

Hm. I suppose, in that case, it’d be best to finish my lessons and my reviews, then go back and unburn all the vocabulary and kanji I don’t remember. For some reason, I keep thinking of starting over as simpler, but unburning would be a better use of time, rather than using up hours going over ones I already know.

How many users here unburn items?

Enough to create this:

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Try not to get too down on yourself about this. I work in Japanese every day, and occasionally I still find myself looking up a word that I (supposedly) learned years ago. Trust that some fragment of a memory of such words are still somewhere in your brain, and revisiting them like this is helping to better cement that memory!

I can’t advise one way or another on WK, but I agree with those like @morteasd who are encouraging you to do more reading if you’re not yet. If you’re prepping for N2, that means you can probably now read a fair amount of material without too big a headache. Doing lots of reading practice helps with the upper-level JLPTs, I think, because you learn how to read faster and skim, which means you’re not so frantic when you’re taking the test.

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You know, that might be the real issue for me. Perhaps I’m using Wanikani as a means to avoid learning more on my level. Like, if I just keep at kanji, I’m still studying, but it’s never hard. I took the N2 a couple of years ago and failed by around 10 points, but it really wasn’t so disastrously difficult to me, I just had trouble with the listening comprehension and reading sections. Perhaps I just need to be honest with myself about what I need to be working on.

Thanks, friend!


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Aha! Understandable–it’s hard to leave a ready-made system for more fuss and bother. But I’d say you’re definitely ready to leap further into books. In fact, you might find it less difficult than you expected.

You probably already know FloFlo, since you’ve been active on WK for a lot longer than me. I find that a little advance vocab study on FloFlo makes reading a breeze!

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