Wanikani memes

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And to celebrate hitting level 8 today…

cloud lol

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Inspired by dropped burn items

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Is that your left or my left? :smile:

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that one felt always easy to me :joy: 左 the 工 looks like a metal bar on a construction side and the ナ is lifting it with ease. In Germany we have a saying like “Er macht das mit Links” which translates to “he’s doing it with (his) left (hand)” aka it’s so easy he can do it with his left hand.

For 右 I just remember ナ is speaking the truth, and therefore it’s the right thing to say.

Me at the moment:

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It’s a joke with many layers

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The way I remember it is from my tae-kwon-do days - when you bow, you hold your right hand in a fist and wrap the left hand around it, which represents the power of the fist tempered by the… uh… temperance of… the other hand. Or something.

Anyway, point is, the ロ in 右 looks kinda like a fist, so that’s right, while the エ in 左 looks kinda like fingers splayed, so that’s left.

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For 左 and 右, I always thought of the katakana - エ、eh, lEHft and ロ, ro, ROight

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So interesting how everyone uses their own little different mnemonics, especially for the more basic, beginner-level kanji.

I have yet another way of differentiating (ひだり) and (みぎ). Admittedly, maybe not really intuitive at all in comparison, but because these were some of my very first kanji learned, I used to remind myself that (みぎ) was the “easier one to write” of the two. I’m right-handed, so that stuck kinda. Well, then there was the other mnemonic for the readings… (ひだり) has an r-sound in it (like the word “right”), so I just remembered that the ones I’d at first expect to be right is actually left and vice versa.

All that got me, was that once I’d become more confident in guessing the correct reading/meaning of the kanji, all that “pick the incorrect one instead”-logic flew out of the window, as my initial hunch was now the correct one. That’s why I try to never again use that kind of logic in remembering stuff… :rofl:

I think I might have later adopted the mnemonic of noticing the way the first stroke of both kanji either goes from left to right in (ひだり), or from right to left in (みぎ).

Ich wünschte, ich wäre da früher auch drauf gekommen! :laughing:

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Aye, I remembered for a while that “hida-right is wrong, and thus left”.

One other trick that someone pointed out here on the forums is that り (as in ひだり) finishes with a curve to the left, while ぎ (as in みぎ) finishes with a curve to the right.

My other trick is to play eenie-meenie-minie-mo, always remembering to start with the left - hi-da-ri = left-right-left = left; mi-gi = left-right = right.

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I love it. The possibilities are endless! haha

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We need to flatten the curve!

4ntmre

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If you are a fan of boxing manga like Hajime No Ippo. The Migi-Hidari combo is burned into memory. The right is almost always the Cannon - the big shot, and left is more of a pace and range setter.

And I always confused between right and stone (it was hard for me to notice the tiny tip on right and the absence of it on stone during the early days). So right is hard as a stone and the left is flexible relating - to your fist and fingers analogy :slightly_smiling_face:

It is always Coach Kamogawa’s image in my head shouting Migi, Hidari and Ippo punching into his mitts :grin:

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