Planets mnemonics


#1

This is a silly issue, I know, but it sort of grinds my gears when I see mnemonics that are really inaccurate to real life. I’m not talking about the ones you need to use your imagination for, but those which “force” me to forget a fact in favor of the mnemonic… or those which actually teach people innacurate information about something.
One example is 土星 which is Saturn and the mnemonic is about how you can “sit” on the ground (土) of Saturn, but those who went to a 101 astronomy class or were remotely interested in the subject would know that Saturn is a jovian planet, aka what is called a “gas planet”… so it does not have solid ground and it’s mostly made of atmosphere and liquid hydrogen.
And don’t get me started on calling Saturn, and the other planets for that matter, “stars”.


#2

Cool.


#3

Planets used to be called stars. They were, in fact, regarded as wandering stars, because they moved relative to the backdrop of the firmament - hence their name, πλάνητες ἀστέρες - planētes asteres, “wandering stars”. Which is to say, planets.

星 basically refers to any celestial body aside from the sun and moon.

Still, if you want a mnemonic for Saturn that doesn’t rely on sitting on the ground, just remember that just as “Saturn” and “Saturday” share a root in English, so too do 土星 and 土曜日.


#4

You know what is cool about planet names?

"土"曜日 ("Sat"urday) and "Sat"urn

Venus, which is 金星 and 金曜日 which is Friday, both share the same sound/kanji. In English this doesn’t happen but Vendredi which is French for Friday and Venus do share the same syllable…

Neptune in Japanese and English are both named after the same thing too… I find it so interesting that these links seem to cross language barriers

(There is probably a reason for this, and someone can definitely explain it better than I can :stuck_out_tongue: and it looks like that someone is @Belthazar )


#5

I agree with you on the “star” idea, so I dismiss my statement about it.
The Saturn mnemonic helps so thanks for that as well.
I still stick to my idea though that it’s not really ok to teach people inaccuate ideas about a subject they possibly don’t know about.


#6

How… is this not just something you use your imagination for? It’s hardly “teaching people inaccurate information”. Nobody thinks you can actually sit on Saturn. I personally struggle to sit on Mars on the best of days.


#7

Well I guess calling Saturn “Saturn” is also silly because it’s based on Roman mythology and the god Saturn doesn’t really exist…


#8

Please see my comment above for the “star” statement :slight_smile:


#9

Right, because making me imagine I can sit on Saturn when in fact it doesn’t have solid ground is not teaching inaccurate info… Most users wouldn’t bother going more in depth in this subject (which is fine), so they might just go in life thinking stuff like this because they read it in a…mnemonic :slight_smile: (which is not fine)


#10

Has any user ever taken a mnemonic seriously as accurate information about anything other than kanji?


#11

Oh, were we not supposed to do that?


#12

It indeed sounds like a good time for personal mnemonics, if things like that won’t stick in your head. ^^

Personally, I disagree that WK “teaches” anything about celestial bodies. When I read a mnemonic, it’s for the retention of kanji.

I don’t see the “construct” mnemonic as factual information about how sweaty Koichi gets when he’s doing construction work. I don’t see the “suspicious” mnemonic as a statement about how untrustworthy their employee Aya is.

If everyone starts taking everything in the mnemonics as facts about life, we’re pretty doomed. :joy:

Change what bothers you, and otherwise: many SRS mnemonics try to grasp the imagination - anything to make you remember. That is of course subjective, and is never going to be to the liking of every individual. It’s not going to appease a desire for strict factual accuracy, I’m afraid.

Good luck, and I hope you stick with things!


#13

But… Saturn is suspected of having a rocky core


#14

Mnemonics are not there to teach anything. They are willingly very silly to make them unforgettable. So you should not take this too seriously. But if you insist …

The density of Saturn’s core is considerably higher than water (even if it’s a gas), so there’s definitely an altitude where you can sit.


#15

I find it funny how people do not take this seriously but do take seriously (and get offended by) mnemonics like SEI and those need to be changed. Just saying.


#16

While we probably have a lot of LGBTQ users on the site, I don’t think we have many people from other planets using wanikani :grin:


#17

I can get as cheesy as to say “you are a member of this galaxy/universe/whatever” and those planets are right next to you :wink:


#18

I love how nice ya’ll to this girl who is clearly pissed off haha. Love you guys


#19

I’m not pissed off. Maybe this is how it comes across from reading the comments. It’s easy to misunderstand this way.


#20

What you could do is compile all the mnemonics that you think are teaching people incorrect information and show it to the community. Basing your statement on one single mnemonic doesn’t really help much. Nor the community or the developers. Then we can all look at the mnemonics, build new ones and then BOOM -

pizza.

pizza can sit on Saturn, I hope.