What's the latest English word you learned thanks to WK

Really? That’s surprising to me, although I confess we don’t have one in the States

Not on WaniKani, but on most JE dictionaries - スキレット = Skillet.

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I never knew that there was another pronunciation! I learned about the Diet of Worms at school and I think we just said diet like normal. Worms is Vurmz though in that context.

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About the kanji 械 used in words like 機械: for so long I thought contraption could be either “something unexpected” (from the Italian “contrattempo”) or “shrinkage” (from the Italian contrazione, in turn from latin con-tratio). Indeed, it’s just a machine. I wish I played Dark Souls in English long enough to run into unmovable contraptions…

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what is the best online english dictionary?

on a lesson I just got the kanji 擦, that means ‘grate’ and in my native language I coudln’t find a word for it.

Is it like gratitude of some sort?

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(Edit: just to address how the word grate is usually used in English without getting into how to use 擦) Grate, as a verb , often means to reduce to small particles by rubbing on something rough (example: grate cheese). Or to just rub something against something else in some contexts. Can be used metaphorically as well (example: grate on one’s nerves)

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It’s like rubbing, chafing, or scraping.

@Leebo, I thought grating cheese would be おろす (either 卸す or 下す)? Does the 擦 kanji actually see use that way? :astonished:

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Yeah, if you were translating to Japanese, you wouldn’t use 擦 for that. But I was just addressing the English. Gratitude is in the entirely wrong realm, and grating cheese is the most common use of grate. The fact that you don’t actually use that kanji for that specific example is worth mentioning though.

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Ah okay! I just wanted to make sure that there wasn’t a usage I was unaware of (which would not be a surprising instance). Thanks for clarifying! :grin:

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