What's the last English word you learned thanks to WK

A shout-out to all non-native English speakers here on WK!

What English words did you learn while doing your lessons? Some of my recent ones are

barb 了
toil 努
hick, the radical in 度
geoduck, the radical in 顔 (I didn’t even imagine such creatures existed)

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Not a word, but a person. I’m going to say he counts.

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Heck, I am a native speaker and I still learned English words from WK :durtle_the_explorer:

Most recent one was brocade (錦), which is this type of fabric:

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We all learn continuously, it indeeds does seem. :smile:

I recently learned what the meaning of ‘ford’ (渉)!

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Epic. He was a pain to learn not only in WK, but also in my philosophy class!

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偽造 forgey
航空母艦 aircraft carrier (didn’t know what it was, not into war stuff)

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I’m a native English speaker, and I still learned some English words from here. Examples include items like lacquere (漆) and eaves (軒).

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„Cleat“ which is… some kind of nail for shoes?

Didn’t know that one in my native language either

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Since we can include people, unfortunately I cannot un-learn this

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I’m ashamed to say that I still don’t think I know how to pronounce his name.

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I don’t remember having to look any English words so far

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It’s the bottom of certain kinds of shoes. They are spiky and used to better keep your footing, especially in more slippery areas like a baseball field.

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Nietzsche, it’s easy to learn how to pronounce his name with katakana

ニーチェ

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And soccer, and golf, and track and field. But I guess some people don’t ever get into sports at all.

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I’m procrastinating learning how to read katakana, though.

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Ford and boisterous. I had heard the word boisterous before but had never bothered to look it up.

And Hard Gay too.

I used baseball because when I played baseball a while back, I remembered the orange area being easier to slip in than the grass. The spikes allowed you to keep your footing better than with the normal shoes. It seemed the clearest illustration.

But yeah, football and golf also use it for similar reasons. It helps to take a stance when there are cleats on the bottom of your shoes.

Arson 放火 .:fire::fire:

I’m certain that I have hear it before, but with the kanji, now I totally get it.

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I knew the word ‘cleat’ anyway, but I’ve only ever heard the ones on sports shoes referred to as studs in the UK. I mostly associate ‘cleats’ with cycling shoes designed to clip into the pedal, and I feel like it’s relevant to ships somehow as well :thinking:

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Sickle is a good one.

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