Unfair answer outcome

Let’s put it this way- “City of Seattle” has the same meaning as you would say “Seattle City” in any instance and whatever level of correctness it contains. However let’s put this logic in “New York” example described above. You can say “New York” which most likely refers to the city, however you can say “New York City” for absolute clarification or “New York State” if you refer to the state. So… both instances are really correct

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Yes, but since there is no other Seattle, as a state or other entity, it really doesn’t get called Seattle City.

As was already written, you can add it as a synonym if you want - I’m just explaining why the literal translation you entered is not an accepted answer.

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But no one calls Seattle ‘Seattle City’. So it’s not really comparable to New York City.

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What I do if this happens sometimes (where I enter a very close synonym instead of the expected meaning) is I will just keep the item in the review queue for 3+ hours. If it shows up in reviews I refresh the page until I get another item. Then after the 3 hours or so, I answer it again (sometimes with the user synonym added) and WK forgets that I got it wrong 3 hours ago.

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That’s simply how they often say things in Japan.

Also, this entry is teaching you how to read the 市 rather than the シアトル. It’s a kanji-learning website, after all.

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Seattle City does sound strange. City of Seattle sounds fine, but official. Japanese people tend to append the type of municipality to things much more frequently in everyday conversations than English speakers do.

I likely would not say “I live in the city of Somerville, Massachusetts” (where I lived before moving to Japan) to someone in a normal conversation, I would just say “I live in Somerville, Massachusetts”, but I do say 尼崎市に住んでいます to people in Japanese. Even though 尼崎 would be acceptable as well, adding the 市 or whatever it is, is just more common in Japanese.

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市 is just a suffix for a city, right? It should be easy to remember just to type the name of the city. Doesn’t seem like a big deal to me.

Interesting conversation about how talking about cities works in Japanese aside, I think the important takeaway here, @BosS_MaarioS, is that WK cannot and does not have every possible English synonym for every vocab. In some cases, the omissions are surprising; in some, it’s just a matter of there being too many. Because of this, they’ve included the ability to add user synonyms so that you can add the equivalent answers that you find intuitive/synonymous/missing/etc. These can be added during review sessions (when you input something that you feel was synonymous and it wasn’t on the list) or on the page for the item. If you want to add synonyms during lessons (I do this regularly!), you can use the following script: [Userscript] WaniKani Lesson User Synonyms v2.

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Let’s put it this way- “City of Seattle” has the same meaning as you would say “Seattle City” in any instance and whatever level of correctness it contains.

I’m gonna go with a no on that, at least in terms of what to call the place name that is Seattle. In Oregon, there’s a city is called Oregon City. If you were to call it “the city of Oregon” people wouldn’t know what you were talking about, at least not with any amount of immediacy. How does “the city of Seattle City” sound? If you say Seattle with any regularity (say you live in the NW of the United States or you work for Boeing), it will likely sound pretty odd given that no one calls Seattle “Seattle City”.

Additionally, while you can take “City” off of “New York City” you can’t do that with “Oregon City”. If you were to say “I live in Oregon” the assumption is that you’re talking about the state as a whole, not the a specific city. In my experience (as someone who is from Oregon and tells people “I’m from Oregon” on a someone basis), no one is going to ask for clarification in terms of whether or not you mean the state of Oregon City. Meanwhile, there is some ambiguity when you say New York.

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Well, I think…when you speak Japanese, you don’t speak English ^o^ You can say Seattle City if you want to, but to say シアトル市 isn’t really the same as saying Seattle City, because 市 here is a suffix that is generally used in Japanese but generally not used in English.

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Another fun is 中央. It’s “CENTRAL, CENTRE” on wanikani. For me it looks like “middle”. It even says so on e.g. wiktionary.

Thank goodness you can add synonyms. (I also added “big bro” for 兄 and all other {big, small} {bro, sis} combinations. It’s tiresome to type “brother” or “sister”)

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I use [Userscript]: Double-Check (Version 2.x) to give myself another chance or mark as correct when I know I’m right or super close – but that my wording was slightly different or my answer not in the WK whitelist (of course I have to be extra careful I’m not accepting answers that have a different meaning or nuance).

I think I made the same mistake as you at some point @BosS_MaarioS, and while many Americans might think it outrageous, I don’t know which US cities have states with the same name etc and am not particularly interested in learning that information right now :slight_smile: So I probably marked it correct and moved on. I add synonyms after I’ve done this more than twice on a word (because sometimes I’ll also type it exactly how WK wants it).

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I feel like it’s kind of a bad idea to turn this into a debate over whether seattle city sounds normal. If you did, you’d have to do the same for EVERY vocab and kanji on WK - and a lot of it is up to interpretation. It is unfortunate when this stuff happens, but that’s why WK added a way to add user synonyms. I personally would say “seattle city” sounds unusual, but if you dont think so, you can add it as a synonym and I wouldnt.

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Luckily you found out in lessons, so there is no ‘penalty’ of being bumped down an srs level! In future you can click on the item on the lesson review page and add a synonym right there! Do make sure by either googling or asking here if your answer doesn’t actually mean something else. Add synonyms in your native language, if that helps!

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If you were learning English, it would be important to understand that “Seattle City” isn’t really normal usage. Since you’re learning Japanese, it just matters that you know that シアトル市 means the big city in the northwest corner of the US.

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A city so nice, they name it twice

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I added a synonym “Seattle City” and it passed in the reviews with green, which in a way it works, so thanks for the suggestions. However this can also potentially exploit the system as I might as well type “a” to every word as a synonym and make 100% pass to level 60 right away, which of course, doesn’t make much sense on its own

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Indeed. With great power comes great responsibility.

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I’m not worried about adding a as much as about adding incorrect synonyms. E.g. 落 is fall. Is it “to fall” or “autumn”? Is WK mnemonic just happens to utilize “to fall” but it’s actually autumn? Mnemonic utilizes falling leaves. Which happens in autumn. I almost added autumn as synonym, but thankfully decided to check other sources first.

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…And with great subscription fees comes great incentive to not cheat the system to get your money’s worth.

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