Understanding Pokemon names' pun

I have problems understanding the truth behind these names.

  • ガーディ
  • ウィンディ
  • ナッシー
  • ロトム
  • ワルビアル
  • ポワルン
  • メガニウム

I have other ones in my Google Sheets as well, but I can only just guess.

If I know something more, I will update in the Sheets.

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Have you seen this Wiki?

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Actually, just now. But I still can’t understand ゲンガー - ポケモンWiki

It comes from the German Doppelgänger hence why the romaji is Gangar, slightly different from the English version Gengar. :slightly_smiling_face:

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It kind of also explains some fan theories of Gengar being a shadow of Clefable. If Gengar is a doppelganger of a Pokemon, Clefable would be likely as its also mysterious and they both have similar shapes.

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Windy? :wind_face:

Bulbapedia usually does the trick for me, it has the names in all the different languages. :eyes:

“Gengar and Gangar are possibly a shortening of doppelgänger , a double of a person, which is fitting for a Pokémon with a habit of pretending to be a person’s shadow. The kanji 幻 maboroshi can also be read as gen and is used in words meaning phantom or illusion . There is also a striking pronunciation similarity to the Danish word genganger , a term for ghosts found in Scandinavian folklore.”

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Based on the english name, because growlithe is both inspired by. normal guardian dog but also a shisha guardian dog statue

Windy because its fast and runs like the wind. Thats it lol

Probably from 椰子 palm tree and something with な. Bulbapedia says its coconut

Same as english name, its just motor backwards

悪い + english word gavial, a species of crocodilian

ポワン is the onomatopoeia of change. I dont think I agree with bulbapedias assumption that the rest is based on 変わる since its officially called powaren, but idk what else could it be

Mega + geranium

Do you want us to go through your sheet too? Not sure if those are the ones you figured out or not

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Guardie?

Hachiko? What is Shisha?

ココナッツ looks more similar.

Seriously, thanks for your thoughts.

Are these two names / species popular in Japanese?

Actually, about the Google Sheets, I think right on the spot, so I can’t be sure.

The German and English pronunciation of “gänger” in “Doppelgänger” is closer to ゲンガー than ガンガー

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Bulbapedia has got ウインディ instead of ウィンディ (small Kana). Since it is supposedly “windy”, maybe the latter is more correct? (I checked with English to Katakana Converter)

Arcanine’s official name in Japanese is ウインディ.

One may argue why GameFreak made that choice or if Japanese folks in practice pronounce it as ウンディ, but all official sources (and sources that care about being precise, such as serebii or bulbapedia) will write ウインディ without a doubt, so I don’t think there is much a case for ウンディ being more correct.

It’s a proper name and pokemon names’ origins are not officially released, just assumed by the gaming community. So even if the correct katakana for “windy” was ウンディ, that doesn’t change the fact the pokemon is named ウインディ.

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It seems not to be the only instance of ウインディ. Japanese folks use both.

There’s no famous English dog name as far as I know. I think OP is referring to the word guard. It makes sense seeing as how they’re commonly used as police dogs in the anime. Plus there was that episode about James/Kojiro and his Gardie protecting him from his fiancé.

Shisa refers to guardian lion dogs from Okinawa mythology. They’re actually originally from China, so you’ll often seen them as statues around shrines all over Japan. But Okinawa is most famous for their shisa motif. The Pokemon Center over there even did a promotion for Gardie as a symbol for their shisa years ago. It was to celebrate the PC’s anniversary.

I just looked it up and they actually used Windie.

But the new games do feature a new form for Gardie which resembles the shisa lions.

ゼラニウム is fairly popular in Japan. We got a few in our house as well.

Interesting, didn’t know about the German pronunciation! Usually katakana is derived from pronunciation but I wonder if they chose the official spelling based on the German spelling? The Japanese name is written as Gangar after all.

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Where do I find this source of not-so-English Japanese names? Like Powalen or Kailios.

Also, on typing カイロス, IME gave an interesting suggestion - カイロスパイセン (slang for 先輩, perhaps)

That’s actually very tricky and the final answer is: there is none.

Japanese pokemon is written in Japanese (duh) and although each pokemon has an official katakana spelling, their Japanese name has no official romaji spelling.

However, Japanese folks (including Nintendo and GameFreak) will use romaji spelling for Japanese names for esthetic reasons on licensed product if so decided. The spelling in these case seems to be… Ad hoc. I believe this website by Nintendo speaks by itself.

https://www.nintendo.co.jp/ds/uzpj/character/

EDIT: Wait, by source did you mean the names’ origins? Now I got confused.

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Kailios is the most strange. It’s not even Romaji-like.

I wouldn’t be surprised if many people just misspell the name because it’s literally just a tiny difference. I used to get bothered seeing Ninetails type (because that seems the most logical choice) even though the official name is Ninetales because it’s more creative or whatever.

The other thing is since the small ィ isn’t typed very often anyway - whether its because people don’t know what keys to press or their computers don’t have the small ィ function (literally hear this all the time since my name uses a small ィ) - it’s an easy mistake to make. Or it’s just easier or more convenient to use the big イ.

If I wasn’t typing from my phone, I wouldn’t know how to write the small version either. :sweat_smile:

Anyway, just because there are multiple forms when you search for them doesn’t mean they’re all official. Its likely it’s spelled ワィンディ vs ワインディ because it’s slightly more creative. Kind of like how they spelled Gastly instead of Ghastly?

Ah, and I just missed that the official name is actually the opposite of what I thought so scratch that. :sweat_smile:

Tradicional spelling for charizard is Lizardon. But if we are going strict “this is romaji” of course it should be Riza-Don as in the website above. There is no rule and they just go by what looks cool, really.

Here Lizardon on official licensed product:

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Thanks. Actually, I can’t find a translation in my native language (Thai), even if Thailand is full of Chinese immigrants (and I am a descendant of those).

There is an official romaji spelling I’m pretty sure, and its the one featured in trademarks and merch, which is also the one bulbapedia uses

Lizardon is never rizardon, kamex is never kamekkusu, and bakugames is never bakugamesu.

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