The quick or short Language Questions Thread (not grammar)

Thanks for correcting my misconception - I thought it was the other way around :slight_smile:
And the building in question is indeed quite old - it’s from the end of the 19th century.

Not sure if this useful, but might be for the future.
There is also a thing called 団地 which is an apartment complex, many of which were built in the second half of the XX century. One could imagine many アパート being in a 団地.

Edit: this discussion suddenly made me interested in urban planning :joy:

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Throwing 団地 into Google image search, it seems to bring out similar results as マンション - modern, tall multi-apartment buildings built from concrete. It’s just that results for マンション seem to be restricted to the more “luxury” ones, while 団地 seems to cover broader range.

But for those smaller buildings such as the one I asked about, アパート seems to be the closest match.

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団地 are always large groups of very similar buildings operated by a single entity. Sometimes it’s almost like a small town within itself. When I first lived in Japan, I lived in a 団地. Yes, the individual buildings are like マンション, but the critical difference was that there were roughly 25 very large buildings in the complex, and there was only one road to get in. Within the complex there were some shops and a post office as well, but no other residences.

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I’m watching 呪術廻戦 and I’m a bit confuse about this scene. They ask “what kind of person do you like”. Nobara (this girl) said she can’t stand a man that かいしょうなし, きんけつ, くさい, けち, and こときれてる. The English subtitles translated as good-for-nothing, poor, stinky, petty, and dead.

My question is “Does こときれてる really means dead?”. 事切れてる could literally translated as dead, but I feel like it should be some kind of slang about man’s personality.
It does not make much sense to me even in an anime level of logic.

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It might be a slang, but I encountered some memes (in the west) when guys joke about their requirements/standards for a girl by saying “must be alive” :wink:

But in this case, going by the another meaning of 事切れてる I’d say that it could perhaps mean “expired” as in “too old”?

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I don’t think that quite fits the context, mostly those memes are about having insanely low standards (i.e. “if she has a pulse, I’m good”) - not quite the thing you’d put after a bunch of standards

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I understand that kind of meme lol.

However, it would not fit the character. Nobara is a girl with strong personality and has very high standard about man types.

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I think it may just be a joke? I can’t find any slang meaning for it, but I think it’s more of an or list than and and list.

So fitting any of those criteria means they’re no good, and being dead is just one of those criteria. Stating the obvious, of course, but the same kind of joke as “I like my soup hot, fresh, well-seasoned and without concrete” I guess.

Was there any sort of followup to that remark?

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Nah it’s just end there.

Some random comment (with high upvote) on YouTube claims that
“It’s not the literal meaning of “dead”. “kotokireteru” means someone who rarely talk or talks in a difficult way to understand. It’s translated “dead” because you can’t feel/relate anything from the person who doesn’t know how to communicate”

But I can’t find any proof about it. Kinda make sense but it’s just a random comment on the internet.

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There’s also a possibility of mistake/error in the subtitles - maybe translator just grabbed the first meaning from JP-EN dictionary :wink:

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It makes some logical sense I guess. I can’t find anything of the sort either, but that doesn’t mean it’s not true, of course.

Judging by monolingual dictionaries I’ve checked it doesn’t seem to have any other meanings, really.

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I don’t blame them if they do because oftenly the translators are not even interested in the show or just translate from the script and never have seen the actual shows.

I tried Thai Subtitles (my native langauge) and it translated as “dead” too. However, Thai subtitle on Netflix are usually just a bit better than Machine Translated subtitle lol.

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Yee its dead in this case

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I assume you’ve watched/read 呪術廻戦

So she’s talking indirectly about Itadori Yuji is not her type?

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I’m not familiar with the anime, but I found some article explaining this scene: 釘崎野薔薇がかわいい!呪術廻戦のツンデレ?好きな男のタイプも紹介! (just scroll down to this image).

I think she said something like: “「かきくけこ」はマジで無理”, so it means that men with “those traits” are not good for her. 無理 in this context is more like “not good” rather than “can’t stand it”.
So basically she meant that men who are “事切れてる” (dead) are not good enough for her.

On a side note, translating is sometimes really hard, especially to get some slang nuances or to translate some word play or something like that to english and on top of that make it feel natural in another language without losing meaning. Sometimes you need to accept some less literal, make another joke or something like that to make it more natural in another language.

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Thank!! I will take my time reading it tonight. It’s look like a good article. It might help me understand more about naunce and word play in this anime/manga.

Have not watched or read but if he can be considered dead (or he has died at some point) in any way, then yeah, that could well be what she’s referring to

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ah sorry, no I haven’t seen it so idk who the heck that is

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I might be missing something here, but doesn’t 無理 usually mean “no good” (well, literally “no reason”, but) and can be used broadly like this?

So what she’s saying is “(men like that) are seriously no go/good”?

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