The "news reading" challenge 🗞

sorry but which huffpost? :sweat_smile: the bikini one?

and it’s okay! maybe try an easier article right now so you don’t get too discouraged, and then go back to that article armed with a few dictionaries at a later date when you’re feeling more confident! you don’t even have to do the whole article, just however many sentences you feel are useful :slight_smile:

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went with this one on the opening matches of the olympics and didn’t find it too bad? the only sentences that gave me any trouble were the one on the fact that it opened in fukushima (just cos it had one of the longest noun phrases i’ve seen in a loooong while and it took some parsing out) and the one in the last quote cos i didn’t quite know what to make of スポーツの力で世界をよくしていきたいです.

i ended up with something like ‘[even though there weren’t many visitors], we want the power of sports to keep doing good for the world’ but that doesn’t make a whole lot of sense to me?

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Hey, I also read this article today!

Going through it, this seems to make the most sense to me.


The article wasn’t too bad, though I can’t say I found it to be too particularly interesting. Maybe it’s because it’s hot and I feel kinda sick.

It’d seem the first game of the olympic event was Female Softball, and on the 21st it was Woman’s Soccer. I believe Australia won the first event.

The last couple of paragrpahs is the effects of the coronavirus on the amonut of visitors.

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Naturally. :stuck_out_tongue:

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went with this one on the promotion of the sumo wrestler taru no fuji (tarunofuji?) to the top rank and though i understand this article, there’s a few bits that had some grammar/phrasing i was unfamiliar with, mainly in the quotes from the man himself. speaking of, even in the simplified version of the article he really sounds like a character!

again, lots of こと and ため phrases in this article, which is good practice! and i’ve learned a lot more about sumo than i knew half an hour ago! so all good things :slight_smile:

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Hey, I also read this article today!

From the article, it’d seem 照ノ富士 was ranked at Ozeki (second-highest), and has been at that rank since 2015. Six years of hard work certainly seemed to have paid off!

I haven’t watched sumo wrestling on tv in months, I honestly ought to watch it more often, it’s pretty entertaining.

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read that one too. Fun and easy article with good practice, and also not many niche verbs or any odd phrases, so I didn’t use the dictionary very much as most of it was from context.

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went with this one but not feeling super great so pretty sure my brain clocked about halfway through (and definitely at the italian lady’s sentence). gonna have to come back to this one, there’s some constructions i’m not super familiar with.

hope everyone else is doing okay!

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Continuing our streak, I also read this article today!


It’d seem foreign exchange students (studying japanese) aren’t able to study abroad in japan due to current regulations. Some argue that since they have been vaccinated it should be safe for them to travel into the country.

I believe the article states there’s been a 60% decrease in foreign exchange students travelling to Japan over the course of two years, and that many have been studying online since.

These courses can be fairly expensive, and I definitely feel for anybody who’s been stuck with an online course over the past two years.

Hopefully things will improve now.

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I couldn’t really find any interesting longer articles that aren’t about Covid or the Olympics today, so I chose two shorter articles:

An archery athlete was asked by organisers of the Olympics to compete in long sleeves to cover up her ‘optimism’ tattoo, since apparently that qualifies as a political message…that decision got reversed though and she will be allowed to compete in short sleeves in her next event. So much clothing related debate around the Olympics :sweat_smile:

The Chinese government decided to limit the amount of homework elementary and middle school students are allowed to be given, as well as transforming cram schools into non profit organisations. Apparently the demanding school system is one of the factors behind the declining birth rate in China, which seems to be the motivating factor behind these educational reforms.

I had been studying lots of N2 grammar these past few days and I was hoping to run into some of these grammar points today but that didn’t happen. Oh well, maybe next time :sweat_smile:

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considering that i’ve read all the nhk easy articles on the main page (from thursday? friday? feels like it’s been longer than normal for news ones) i went back to one that looked interesting from earlier in the week.

this is about one of the winners of the akutagawa award, li kotomi. she was originally born in taiwan and started learning japanese at 15 and then moved to japan and wrote an award-winning novel (only the second non-native speaker to earn that award). that’s incredible to me, that you can be comfortable enough in a non-native language (started later in life) to write a novel. 日本語で小説を書くのは本当に大変です indeed!

the only things that gave me trouble in this one were the novel title (took me a second to realise what the construction was) and the description of said novel (admittedly partly cos i misread 文化 as 変化 cos i was reading too quickly, but also making 海に流されて知らない島 work in my head)

interesting read tho!

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finished le article!!!

Short little article about the dangers of leaving a child in a hot cur during summer. the attached video and final paragraph are about a smart car key that can help save young children’s lives.
Overall pretty easy read, in fact, one of the words I didn’t know at first, I was able to understand the dictionary entry for!!! (that one was heatstroke)

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personally love moments like this, ngl, it’s a great feeling :slight_smile:

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new articles! went with this one on the olympic opening ceremony (just cos i haven’t watched it yet) and didn’t find it too bad! a few words i didn’t know but nothing much beyond that that gave me any trouble. at least i don’t think so, my brain feels pretty fried atm :sweat_smile:

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to this day I find it really odd about わかる

from anime I always thought and think about it meaning understand, but for articles like this

匂においがわからなくなった人の40%は、1か月あとも治らないと答えました。

what would be the best match to translate this verb?

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I also happened to read this article today.

It’s generally a good idea not to leave any small living thing in a hot car for long periods of time with the doors locked.

Honestly, I’m not sure I have much else to add.


Remember to take good care of yerselves in this heat!

Now, leaving dogs in hot cars on the other hand…

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double checking on jisho (and making sure that 匂い doesn’t take わかる as its standard verb) i’m gonna say ‘comprehend’ might a good idea for this context if i’m understanding the sentence correctly. i’d say ‘discern’ but that’s not listed as one of the meanings and might be a bit far off base

わかる has a wide range of nuances, and sometimes picking the right one can be hard :sweat_smile:

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What’s the context for this? From the rest of the sentence it sounds like it’s talking about people losing their sense of smell due to covid, so I’d translate the sentence as “of the people who lost their sense of smell, 40% responded that it hadn’t returned after one month”

but yeah, in general わかる means “to understand” but sometimes takes on the meaning of having an experience of something, so “not knowing smell” means not being able to experience smell.

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In other news

glad to see that Japanese people also sometimes give their kids ridiculous “creative” names. The brother sister Judo team for Japan are named “123” and “Poem”

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here i am early with today’s article! went with this one on djokovic and the other athletes requesting that matches be moved to evening time to avoid the intense heat and humidity. had very few issues with this one, just a brief confusion with 第2セットと第3セットの間で as to whether that meant between sets two and three or during sets two and three, but i’m pretty sure it’s ‘between’.

also not sure i agree with the measures they’ve ended up taking. it doesn’t feel like enough…

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