The hiragana is shorter than the Kanji!

I just thought this was cool and wanted to share. This is the first time I’ve seen this-- has anyone seen other examples?
It means “to remove weather stripping”

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Shouldn’t that be the other way around?

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Shouldn’t that just be めばりはぐ?

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Yeah, just appears to be a mistake.

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Yeah, Jisho has this:
image

Could it be that めぐ is the short form or something?

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Google doesn’t seem to think so.

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Um…yes.
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:scream:

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I mean, this does happen, apparently just not with that example:

Sometimes, jukujikun can even have more kanji than there are syllables, examples being kera (啄木鳥, woodpecker), gumi (胡頽子, silver berry/oleaster),[22] and Hozumi (八月朔日, a surname).[23] This phenomenon is observed in animal names that are shortened and used as suffixes for zoological compound names, for example when 黄金虫, normally read as koganemushi , is shortened to kogane in 黒黄金虫 kurokogane , although zoological names are commonly spelled with katakana rather than with kanji anyway. Outside zoology, this type of shortening only occurs on a handful of words, for example 大元帥 daigen(sui) , or the historical male name suffix 右衛門 -emon which was shortened from the word uemon .

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海鷂魚(えい, a ray)also falls into this category, however it’s usually just 鱝.

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