Tell me your WHY!


#42

I can’t remember why i started learning japanese. But i can say that i’m fully addicted to that.


#43

If Matt from Utah can do it, I can too.

MY NEW LIFE MOTTO


#44

I just wanted to learn to make sushi. Seven years later I can speak Japanese but no sushi. I can make some other good Japanese food though.


#45

Originally, Dir en grey. but a year ago I found this band:

Their positivity brought a lot of change to my life, and motivated me to become the best person I can.


#47

@arjoykanji

@irrelephant 's story

In May we had a reservation at a wonderful, tiny sushi restaurant and I was seated next to an American guy. I didn’t expect him to just start chatting with the sushi chef, asking him questions about the fish that he was using, complementing him about the sushi, all in what seemed to me to be fluent Japanese. That was the moment when I didn’t want to be this ignorant any longer. I thought: if Matt from Utah can do it, I want to do it too.

but I think Matt from Utah could be anyone


#49

Maybe we can have a petition to have Matt from Utah be turned into a mnemonic in WK? So that we all will always be reminded of him and his skills :rofl:


#51

:joy: :joy:

Nothing against Matt of course, super nice guy. If anyone in Seoul knows a Matt from Utah who lives there with his wife and two dogs then say hi from me and that he unknowingly changed my life (because it definitely hasn’t been the same since I started learning Japanese; who needs free time anyway!).

All for it.
がんばりましょう!


#52

This is why I love WK so much. Particularly now that I make an effort to write down every review, studying has become a lot of fun.

And I do have a certain love of syllabaries! Though for writing in English and most other languages I write in, there has to be a way to put down single consonants–which only adds to the complexity of the script.


#53

Great motto, I will remember it. :smiley:


#54

Um… I know a Matt from Utah. He’s a black belt, and super hot. Super hot. He can be our inspiration.

IF MATT FROM UTAH CAN DO IT, SO CAN I.


#55

I picked it because it was hard. I always liked the way Japanese sounded anyway.

Plus I used to like Anime quite a bit, though I watch less now.


#56

The most true answer for me is: I don’t know.


#57

DUDE Yes. Me too. I love how beautiful this language is, and as silly as it is, I really love that nobody around me has any idea what the heck I am writing. Also, I guess I kind of hate that too, because that also means I don’t have anybody to speak with or to correct my work. But anywho, yes to the secret codes!

:facepunch: fist bump!


#58

ahh, I feel you on the other language thing. I lived in Germany in middle school and studied German for a few years after that. Even knowing another language, I still much prefer Japanese, but gosh it’s so much harder than German, which is closely related to English. I sometimes wish I liked German as much as I like Japanese when I’m super frustrated with learning Japanese.


#59

What the heck does that say o__o


#60

Haha, that sounds like so much fun!! Oh my gooosh. I just started keeping a WaniKani notebook, and my seven year old saw me writing in it and she was like, “Oooo teach me your ways!” :rofl:


#61

I started learning Japanese after I moved to Japan. Once I got the hang of living in Japan, I took on the challenge of learning the language properly. For me, it’s about 50% wanting to be able to communicate, and 50% enjoying learning something difficult and new.


#62

omg, dying :joy::joy:

Mine too!
:v:がんばてね!


#63

Like a lot of people my first exposure to Japanese in general was through anime. I also enjoyed a lot reading manga. Eight years ago my mom got me a textbook that taught japanese through manga called “Japonés en Viñetas” (my native language is Spanish) and I thought it was really cool. After that I stopped studying for several years until I found about WK, and here I am. Before, I just thought it was cool, now I study Japanese because I really love everything about japanese culture, I also want to get my masters degree in Japan and work/live there if possible, lol.


#64

If you don’t know anyone in real life, I strongly suggest you try to find Japanese internet friends (preferably who are learning English too). I have one and sometimes I swear that’s what helps me learn the most.

Helps that one of my real-life friends speaks Japanese too.