Simple られ question

#1

In the following example:

きのうから口がとじられない。
I haven’t been able to close my mouth since yesterday.

Does the られ part roughly translate to the able to part of the sentence?

#2

Are you meaning that if you were to take the られ out of the sentence if it would mean that or if it means that when it is specifically in a verb?

#3

Within that sentence - I guess it would need to be attached to a verb right?

#4

Yeah, but it technically doesn’t have any meaning by itself as kana. It would need to be attached to the verb and have the conjugation.

#5

Ah I see - so for example - たべられない would mean “not able to eat (it)”?

1 Like
#6

Yeah, the られ puts it as potential, but its not always られ.

yup.

#7

Yep! That is exactly how it would work! Though you would be saying it casually with that.

#8

Sometimes there isn’t even a ら XD

#9

Wow, this is so cool, thank you guys so much. I’ve just started a week ago and feel like I’m learning so much.

#10

Here are the rest of the possible ways to write potential form, btw

3 Likes
#11

If you want to boggle your mind even more with Japanese verbs at a pace equal to your WaniKani speed, check out http://waniconjugation.co.nf/ :grinning: You’ll drill your base vocabulary of verbs at the same time as getting some quality grammar practice. :smiley:

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#12

For some reason that site is blocked at my school :frowning:

#13

Because of the .co.nf

closed #14

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