New People Questions! ~~~<3 [Lost?! Confused?! We're here to help!]

THANK YOU <3 Hilda is BAE.

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Also thank you so much for the link! I just installed it!

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Hilda is one of my favourite characters to use in FE3H, she says she’s weak but she’s one of my strongest :joy:

No worries, it’s one of @Kumirei’s many useful scripts :blush:

Not sure if you’ve seen it but the thread below lists a lot (if not all) of the scripts and apps that WK users have developed. It’s a long list so if you can’t find what you’re looking for just ask.

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Argh, I didn’t know this. I haven’t been reading those notes, just relying on the ‘to do x to something’ answering system to pick up intransitivity. I will keep more of an eye out now as I go through!

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Welcome! Some people find mnemonics more helpful than others. But in general, try to make as vivid a little scene in your mind as you can. Use pictures, sounds, smells, whatever.

One I did recently involves the word ‘inspect’ with components of tree, top hat and the sound “さ”. So I spend some time picturing a dusty parade-ground with old-fashioned redcoat soldiers in tall hats - with trees growing out of each hat. The sergeant major shouts “ready for inspection … Sah!”.

This seems like a lot of work, but if you do it well, you never have to do it again, that image will stick long enough for you to internalise both meaning and sound.

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Are you remembering the readings and meanings in spite of not remembering the mnemonics?

if you are, then I would only skim the mnemonics for now, and only worry about remembering or making your own, when you’re having trouble remembering the meanings or readings of the vocab or kanji. When you’re a bit further along in WK (10s or 20s maybe), you could use the [Userscript] Keisei 形声 Semantic-Phonetic Composition script. It can help you lay connections between kanji with common components, which indicate a common reading.

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Might have missed it in the About/FAQs (all I saw was a long list of keyboard shortcuts) but is there a general guideline for the functions of the forum itself somewhere? For those of us ancient enough to have only used old vBulletin style forums of ages past?

e.g. How to quote multiple users in the same reply, how the bookmarking/flagging system works, things of that nature?

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Hej,
I’m not sure if (/where) we have it here in the WK forums but feel free to have a look into the following pages:

Especially the first of the two links covers a couple of you questions, as far as I can see.

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Thanks, this looks really useful.

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Hey! Discourse (the forum host) actually has an interactive tutorial that is supposed to launch the first time you log in to the forums. However, on the WaniKani community, private messages have been disabled, and the tutorial was dependent on the private messages working.

However, you can create an account in the Discourse sandbox


and the tutorial should work in there. The sites function essentially the same, so you’ll be learning what will be applicable on here too.
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Thanks -
Follow up question - any idea why private messages are disabled? That seems like it would be a useful function.

Is there no way to directly contact another user outside of a public thread? What if I feel the need to send you a series of intimate photos of my bank details?

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There were some issues with intimidation and harrassment of users, so PMs got disabled.

You can ask for an email address, and they can delete it right after you copy it, or you can connect through discord, as well, many users are on a server somewhere.

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Also the staff are not comfortable with being able to view everyone’s private conversations

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Should a user complete a lesson/quiz(also, is this a quiz or a review?(also, is a lesson anything that is new material even if it’s just one radical?)), how long should they expect to wait until their first review? After completing the review, how long should they expect to wait for the next one?

I am sorry for asking what has probably been explained multiple times, but after seeing a post or two by people who are level 60 explain it one way, feel as though I understand it, and then have an altered experience to what they explain, I am beyond lost.

A ‘lesson’ is a single item that you learn. You are given a group of lessons (you set the number from1 to 10) where you are shown new items and ‘quizzed’ on them. You never have to do those lessons again.

In a short time, the items that you learned in the lessons will appear as ‘reviews’. Reviews come back over and over again until you have learned them by heart. Each review has two questions - reading and meaning. If you get both questions right, it goes up a ‘level’ and will take longer to come back. If you get a review right enough times it is ‘burned’ and you never have to do it again.

When you have got a review right 4 times in a row it reaches the ‘guru’ level and will unlock new lessons and the cycle begins again : )

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Fastest progress possible
Review SRS Level Total Wait Next Level
Lesson Apprentice 1 - 4h
1 Apprentice 2 4h 8h
2 Apprentice 3 12h ~1d
3 Apprentice 4 1d 11h ~2d
4 Guru 1 3d 10h ~1w
5 Guru 2 1w 3d 9h ~2w
6 Master 3w 3d 8h ~1M
7 Enlightened 7w 5d 7h ~4M
8 Burned 24w 6d 6h -
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I guessing that if i want to ask questions, i just reply.

So i read the tofugu learn japanese guide and i still can’t wrap my head on kanji.

First of all, the guide said that kanji are made from radicals and they gave a radical sheet, in the sheet there was words that are made up of other radicals so why are they on the sheet? It is because they are included as radicals or what?

Second thing is whats the difference between kanji and vocabulary? I thought kanji are pretty much words of the japanese language so why are they mentioning vocabulary differently than kanji?

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You might have to give some examples, or at least point directly to what you’re referring to so we can understand.

Kanji are a way to write words in Japanese. They express concepts, but they are not themselves words. Japanese existed as a language before they borrowed the way of writing via kanji from China.

It’s true that some words are written with only one kanji, but there’s still a separation between “the word” and “the kanji used to write the word.” Because you don’t need to write words with kanji if you don’t want to. You can use katakana or hiragana instead.

For instance, 水 is a kanji that represents the concept of water. It’s also used to write the Japanese word for water, which is みず (mizu) and in kanji みず is just written as 水.

But you can take that kanji and combine it with other kanji to make other words too. Like you can take the kanji that represents “wearing clothes” which is 着, to make 水着 (みずぎ, mizugi, bathing suit / swimwear).

The words みず and みずぎ can exist without being written in kanji as well. So does that clarify how kanji and vocabulary are different?

This is without even getting into the many words that can’t be written in kanji ever because they just have no associated kanji.

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Is this where newbie ask question?if so i have some question here

You know radical ground and kanji one(いち)?

Both are like this (一)

How do you guys know which is ground and which is one?sometimes idk wether i should read it as いち or just like you read the ground radical,im really new at these kanji stuff

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During reviews you can look at the background color. It’s blue for radicals, pink for kanji and purple for vocabulary. It also asks for radical/kanji/vocabulary meaning on the prompt itself, so there are a few ways to differentiate what it’s asking for.

That being said, I have answered “one” to the radical myself sometimes. :grin:

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