My hesitation to subcribe

I used to have that problem more near the beginning, and I do still have that problem now and then, but honestly it ends up easing up a bit – and in the cases where it still gets switched on me my intuition has me believing that it’s because I’ve not really “gotten” the readings ironed in as well as I thought that I did. With that in mind, it feels good to have a few extra drill opportunities. Honestly, as I’ve started having the steady cascade of burns coming at me, I’m literally grateful for each item I miss because it’s insurance for getting it ironed in before it’s burned. I feel like sometimes items get “burned” (removed from the queue of reviews) before I feel super secure in them. :sweat_smile:

All the same, definitely make the decision according to your comfort level! :cherry_blossom:

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Yes! The WK forums are an absolute goldmine!! <3

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Thanks for taking time to reply !
Well,I never saw it that way! I guess It is not that bad I actually don’t have much of a good memory so having more oportunity to work on certains items is nice, I only wish it wouldn’t slow me on stuff I’m pretty confident on I guess lol.

That is pretty wise I will keep it in mind!

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Eventually that’s the sort of thing you just get a feel for. Just remember that if it’s a kanji, it’ll be asking for the on’yomi reading, and if it’s a vocab, it’s asking for whichever reading you use for that kanji by itself (generally kun’yomi). In real life, if you ever see these kanji by themselves, you’ll use the reading from the vocab. The on’yomi reading in and of itself isn’t really a word-- it’s kind of like a root or prefix/suffix in English. It’s used in many words that are similar, but it itself is not a word.

I’m not sure if I’m making any sense, or if this helps at all, but that’s how I see it. There’s also generally a difference in how the different readings sound, the on’yomi readings for kanji tend to be a lot of the same king (kou, jou, ka, shi, kaku etc are the first that come to mind I see everywhere). Kun’yomi tend to not have quite so many similarities, seeing as they’re actually words and need to be differentiated.

Anyway, I wouldn’t worry about it too much. It’s something that you’ll gradually get the hang of over time, along with getting better at guessing readings for vocab and getting faster at memorizing kanji. It’s all practice :relaxed: Good luck!

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(The thrill of zooming along is great! It’s a significant motivator for me too, moving up the levels at a certain pace, so I completely understand wanting and needing to minimize the obstacles you’re encountering to your swift progress! :grin: (I’m too chicken and not crab enough to try them, but apparently there’s an entire universe of awesome and useful scripts to help avoid getting needlessly held back by little typos and such.))

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Just to clarify, this does cover the broad strokes, but the kanji reading asked for in the review could be either the onyomi or the kunyomi, but onyomi readings are more commonly used in the lessons.

Also, plenty of beginner words do use the onyomi as well, such as 点, 天, 本, 円, 文, 肉, 字, 図, 金, 会, 死, numbers, etc…

Basically remembering how the word is read just comes with experience, which is what you were saying.

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Yep, as with just about everything having to do with Kanji, there are exceptions everywhere… Annoying but hey you get used to it. Over time it even gets easier to predict the exceptions, sometimes when I see a new vocab word it just feels like it’s going to use the kun’yomi or have rendaku, and more often than not I’m right. It helps to say the answers out loud if possible so that the right answer will feel more familiar than the wrong ones. Doesn’t always work but it seems to help for me

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Hiya! I was also in the exact same position as you a while back. I am not sure of your financial situation but I also took some time (1-2 months deliberation / budget prep) before subscribing to WK. Regardless if you subscribe or not, I hope you can continue your japanese language journey!

As for on/kunyomi readings, this article helped me a ton. I also used this article as a guide to formulate a study plan while on the WK trial. It took me forever to figure out my learning pace but having a schedule and parameters really helped me fight off frustration and made me retain information better.

When I run into bad days / feel demotivated, I often look outside of WK, such as making my own mnemonics, learning to write the kanji I just learned, learn grammar, learn new kanji / vocab outside of WK lessons. Anything to make learning japanese fun again.

I hope that helps!

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I thought WaniKani forgives you if you enter a different reading for a kanji and just makes you enter it again?

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Only if you give the vocab reading for the kanji, not the other way around.

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Ah, I thought OP was just talking about kanji cards. Isn’t it normal to expect giving the wrong reading for a vocab card to be marked as wrong?

Edit: Oh I think I misunderstood OP’s post to be a critisism of WK for not having the “net”, when it’s probably not that. Nevermind me.

I’d recommend getting a lifetime subscription - there are usually discounts at the end of the year. You’ll save more money that way.

If you don’t think WaniKani is for you, have a look at the Kodansha Kanji Learner’s course book along with the Memrise deck (which is free).

Good luck with your decision :slight_smile:

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Some good suggestions already, but this Tofugu (from the wanikani folks) article may also help you to pin down some of the concepts a bit more solidly in your mind. Good luck!

I don’t know about your financial situation but there is a 33% sale around Christmas every year for the lifetime and (I think also for the) yearly subscription. You could buy a yearly subscription and then buy the lifetime around christmas. The money that wasn’t used in the yearly description is automatically subtracted from the lifetime subscription. The Prorate is calculated to the second. This way you can save a lot of money.

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In terms of onyomi vs kunyomi, I think in my brain I separate based on the color of the background. Generally onyomi is pink, kunyomi is purple. Or maybe it’s the other way around… Somehow my brain just knows.

Of course when it comes to reading, it is taking a LOT of time for me to figure out a word but the more I see an example, the better I am getting at it.

Besides what other people have suggested, there are alternatives like Anki or Memrise which also use SRS. They are both free to use.

they even made a full wanikani deck on Anki : )

I want to thanks everyone for taking time to reply y’all are awesome :pray:

I see a lot of people explaining the difference of the reading but my problem is that I understand and know them but I just can’t tell which one WK wants me to answer, which is messing with my progress. Sorry if it was unclear but anyways thanks it is always good to go over basic stuff all over again!

Thank you it will sure help!!

I didn’t know I could do that so thanks a lot! It is still a huge investment for me but I guess I’ll see around the sales.

oh I didn’t know it was a complete deck on Anki?? Thanks for letting me know I’ll be looking onto that since I already have Anki set up!

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One of the best things I’ve done for my study so far is using the Katakana Madness script. It changes each kanji’s on’yomi to katakana (which is normally how it’s done conventionally if you look up dictionaries: hiragana for kun’yomi; katakana for on’yomi).

It only works for the kanji (pink) items, it doesn’t change in vocabulary (purple) items since those use hiragana. It just changes the input if it asks for the on’yomi, and it still shows hiragana for the kun’yomi, so you can easily check that way which reading it’s asking for. If you need help with how to set up scripts, you can check this guide.

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That sounds like a great script! I use the Tsurukame app, and it seems to do this for the pink onyomi – using katakana – and it does seem like it’s better for me to see it that way since that’s how it seems to be presented in kanji dictionaries and such.

@voshira Welcome!! :grinning: Nice to meet you, and thank you for the helpful article links. I’m looking forward to reading them! I’m having a lot of trouble with pacing myself, actually, so your post was very encouraging and inspiring. Thank you very very much for sharing what’s been working for you! All the best to you in your studies!
:tea:

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@Slooshy Thank you for the warm welcome! I am glad it helped, all the best to your studies as well. :rainbow:

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