Most recent Japanese word you've learned?


#1247

裁量労働制(さいりょうろうどうせい) flexi-time, flexible working hours


#1248

風船ガム (ふうせんがむ) bubble-gum

:wind_face::sailboat::candy::stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:


#1249

Igo (waffles). It means “after this” but it also means waffles (to me).


#1250

沸かす(わかす)to boil (water)
that one tripped me up on JLPT4. I’m pretty sure I had heard or read it somewhere like 10 months ago, but now I won’t forget anymore, I think!


#1251

I like when I spot two kanji I know in the wild in a word I dont know, but can guess. The hospital I was in for work today had 吸引 connections on the inside walls.


#1252

ぷー太郎
wondered what 郎 is used for except cursing at people.
you can also insult them with it. that’s great. 受けた。


#1253

Most recent one I have learnt is: でんとうてき (traditional) was talking about proposals and marriage differences between Uk and Japan with my italki teacher.


#1254

リア充 which is the equivalent of “normalfag” in internet slang. An extreme abbreviation of リアル充実がしている = person who is fulfilled in real life.
And of course the opposite, 非リア充 .
I wonder why I haven’t learned this one before, it’s so cool. :smirk:


#1255

I just learned that WK もう “to say humbly” is actually the same verb used in “My name is…”

マイクともうします。

My name is Mike.

I didn’t know the と is a particle used with this verb, always thought it was part of the verb! :sweat_smile:

And I learned this from reading the example sentences, so yeah it’s definetely worth doing!


#1256

Poor kid whose name is 太郎. He’s in the first book of Minna no nihongo. His dad is 山田一郎, I believe. So the insult connection is not so close to the front of my mind.


#1257

太郎 and 花子 are the japanese equivalent of john/jane doe :slight_smile:


#1258

はらはちぶん or just はらはちぶん eating until 80% full

hara = stomach, hachi-bun = 8/10.

From Misa Sensei.

But when I searched this forum last night, I saw @MissMisc already posted about this in this forum though not focused on this new Japanese word I think. :thinking:


#1259

I just learned 鍵 (かぎ, key) and 見つける (みつける, to locate/discover) from a Japanese Youtuber playing Mario Maker. I guess listening pays off even if you only understand the occasional thing here and there.


#1260

ガラケー・ガラパゴス携帯(けいたい)

Japanese specialized flip phones pre-2010. This led to an interesting entry on Galápagos syndrome which is essentially a metaphor for highly evolved/complicated products (particularly in Japan) that have very little flexibility internationally resulting in market isolation (name after Darwin’s Galápagos study of evolution).


#1261

I learned that 角 also means “antlers”.
I’m glad this was a manga I was translating, otherwise I’d have been wondering why they talked about cutting angles and why angles can poke your eye out. :sweat_smile:


#1262

Today I learned that Shizuoka basically means Silent Hill. It’s now up there with Origin of Bears for my favourite literally-translated place names.


#1263

とっきゅう (特急) or Limited Express train. Needless to say I missed my stop.


#1264

It would have been fun if the Silent Hill game series was born here… But no :sweat_smile:
I’ve just read it’s the birthplace of Hidetaka Miyazaki though, the guy behind the Dark Souls series, so still pretty good.


#1265

台本 meaning script.
I picked it up when I was watching Terrace House last night.


#1266

さじ or スプーン = spoon

But then さじを投げる is the equivalent of giving up or “to throw in the towel​”.

For some reason japanse people give up by throwing their spoons and not their towels :thinking:

then the first definiton for the phrase in the J-J dictionary is
さじを投げる
(1)医者が、治る見こみがないとして、病人を見はなす。
(A doctor gives up patient that is no longer expected to get well)

I wonder if the expression has something to do with that, along the lines of throwing away the spoon with which the medicine was given… :open_mouth:

Anyway… my currents thoughts on japanese spoons :crazy_face: