Most recent Japanese word you've learned?

Most recent one I learned was 海軍「かいぐん」 or ‘navy’ in order to say that someone is in said navy.

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(ひょう) or (あられ) - hail (the weather phenomenon)

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やきもちを焼く - to be jealous (to burn with jealousy)

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天下り literally “descend from heaven” but used to describe bureaucrats taking a job in a private company. “Revolving doors” in English ( I think ) “pantouflage” in French. Funny expression, kind of poetic.
It’s also a new reading for 天 since 天下り is pronounced あまくだり

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弱肉強食 - survival of the fittest, literally “the weak is meat, the strong gets to eat”

This has gotta be my favorite 四字熟語 so far. Not so much because of the meaning, but the way it’s written is hella wild.

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脱線(する)- derailment (related to transportation), but also digression (derailment of a discussion)
脱走(する)- escape from prison, but also breakout, desertion, etc.

Added to my Anki sets. This should totally be a vocab item in WaniKani! Thanks for sharing! :slight_smile:

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It’s more of an expression than a single word, but 腹を立てる(はらをたてる). It means to get angry at or to take offense.

(みみ) can mean bread crust

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Does learning 違くない count as learning a new word? :eyes:

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I thought that it was just a form of (ちが)い, but jisho.org informs me that that version is actually a noun

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It gets better:
間違える - to mistake something for something else (と for the mistaking target and を for the object)
間違う - to be mistaken
間違い - mistake (also a noun)

There is quite a bit of “action nouns” ending in き and い, actually :slight_smile: .

Word for today:
一応目を通す - to have a quick look at something (to pass a rough glance/look)
預金保険制度 - deposit insurance system (couldn’t remember 預金 and 制度 so…)
水準器 - spirit/bubble level (carpentry and architecture tool for checking that a surface is even)

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Thanks, I can never look at this kanji the same ever again. :joy:

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And also, the negative is 違いない rather than 違いじゃない

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To be fair, other nouns can “fuse” with ない as well, like 問題ない or 心ない.

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writes down more notes

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:smirk:

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Actually, if you look out for nouns that are related to verbs, you’ll realise that a lot of them are just some version of the masu-stem of the verb. It’s a pattern I spotted pretty early on, and I’ve always treated the masu-stems of verbs as things that can be used as nouns by default. Of course, there are cases where that’s not appropriate, but it usually works. For example:
答え
金持ち
間違え (which is from the transitive version of 間違う)
成り行き (course of events – 成り行く is ‘to gradually unfold’)
飲み (the act of drinking)
余所見 (the act of looking elsewhere, generally distractedly; the last kanji is read み, so it’s quite clearly the masu-stem)
花見
etc.

This pattern is everywhere, so it’s quite useful to be aware of it. It helps with understanding. As for how to intuit it from beginners’ grammar…

Remember [masu-stem]+に行く・来る? Why would we so happily attach に to the stem if it weren’t acting as a noun? ‘To go/come for the purpose of [action expressed by masu-stem]’ is probably the most logical explanation.

(Yes, in structures linked to Classical Japanese, sometimes, it’s the noun-joining form=連体形 that gets treated like a noun, like in「我が力、見るがいい」, so the masu-stem isn’t the only ‘noun form’, but this stuff is much rarer in modern Japanese.)

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ネタバル spoiler

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ネタバレ :wink:

The root verb is ばれる

Less a Japanese word and more very amusing ateji: I was looking up some cities on japanese wikipedia, and went to the page for Cambridge (MA). The katakana is ケンブリッジ which makes sense, but there’s also ateji of 剣橋, which is the ケン reading for 剣 plus bridge!