Loose context sentence translations

This seems like a rather loose translation. Is it an aphorism in Japan? (EDIT: seems like it is) How loose or literal are context sentence translations, generally? They generally seen pretty literal to me, but I don’t pay much attention to them.

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I would say they’re usually not literal, since it’s a better translation when you can understand what the intent is rather than just putting the largest amount of original words you can.

I see people asking about these translations here, because they don’t see how they map.

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It’s indeed a Japanese proverb that therefore do not get a literal translation but is mapped to English proverbs/translation focused on the underlying meaning.

他所は他所、家は家 // よそはよそうちはうち - we have our rules, they have theirs; our house, our rules​

I don’t think this is a great translation of the sentence on WK part. @Mods thoughts? It doesn’t have the proverb feeling that I think it should convey. :thinking: Or something marking it as a proverb might also help people better understand the translation offered. :slight_smile:

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NTA; their house, their rules.

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Well, the underlying meaning is “our house, our rules [ignore what others do]”.

The more literal route might be “Others have their home, we have ours”

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I think the translation is already ok, though. It’s generally better liberal, if attempts have been made to translate.

Discussions should be encouraged too, like this.

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We just have to agree to disagree on that one. I do feel it’s hard to follow the translation choice as it’s neither an English proverb nor a literal translation.

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@ekg I second “Our house, our rules” being a better translation.

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Thanks for the ping! I’ll ask the content team to take a look at this discussion.

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ありがとうございます!

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