Level 60 is not the end?


#11

The burning is kind of the point of using an SRS program. That said, I’m not going to burn all the items here – I’ll be satisfied with most of the kanji burnt.


#12

I will say, even words I never thought I’d use on this site, most of them I’ve come across at least once.


#13

Actually, I continued to study more Kanji outside WaniKani which includes Joyo, N1 list, some common Jinmeiyo and other common Kanji outside those lists. It is around 20 levels.

Done in Anki, I don’t plan to burn those things, though. Initial recognition only.

At least, I don’t have to do 300+ reviews per day. (Currently around 100 per day.) So, I have a plenty of time to study grammar. Still, I am better at study vocab along with new Kanji; better than studying grammar. That’s why I continue to study new Kanji.

I might plan to resurrect lower level burns, for Vocab, to ensure that I understand the meaning of the vocab well, beyond English interpretation. You see, when I understand more grammar, the sense of vocab usage should be deeper.

Whether I should resurrect Kanji, I am not sure. But there is indeed a deeper meaning of Kanji, that is, Japanese meaning – Kanji meaning (not in English)

After some time, I wonder if I should get a 4-month interval for stuff outside WaniKani, that is, Burning. It can be hard to do in Anki. Maybe I should try Houhou 1.2 - Dictionary and SRS application for Windows?


#14

So, I’ve been studying Japanese for like 8 years seriously (10 years in total but without academic instruction and study) but my kanji has always been terrible. I can’t remember how to write it. I can’t remember the exact pronunciation. I sometime can’t even remember the meanings of some pretty basic stuff. My grammar and vocabulary is decent, so now that I’ve started on here I feel like I’ve been going through pretty easily.

There are loads of times when I get a new radical or something and it occurs to be how super, ultra hard remembering any of the kanji on here would be if I didn’t know the grammar and vocabulary I do. Like, I’m pretty sure if I just started without anything else I would give up during level 1. I really commend anyone who has gotten far at all without more immersion because that must be crazy hard.


#15

I started WaniKani almost completely on a whim december 2015, after having learned the kana a few weeks prior on a similar whim. The first maybe 10 levels I treated it almost like a game; a fun distraction that also happened to help me read funny Chinese symbols.

Then, after a while, I realized that maybe it’d be fun to actually learn the language itself, but I didn’t start seriously studying grammar until maybe level 15, and started trying to trudge through simple manga and NHK News Easy at like level…25-ish maybe. It was actually around here I actually started gaining an apprecation for Japanese media outside of games, believe it or not. :slight_smile:

Basically, you can definitely get far without immersion if you have some sort of reason for trying to (a fun, gamified distraction in my case), but now I’m addicted to learning more Japanese, so I can consume more of this wonderful media they produce. I should register with Japanophiles Anonymous or something… :slight_smile:


#16

I would not put much stock in “immersion”, especially for a native English Speaker. I have a degree in Japanese, I live in Japan, I use Japanese at work, my wife is Japanese (she doesn’t speak English); but, I found that my Japanese test scores went down after I moved to Japan and relied only on “immersion” and not dedicated studying. Most people in daily life in Japan use a limited vocabulary, so while you get very good at basic conversations, you definitely are not learning more Kanji (and therefor vocabulary) by being “immersed”. Additionally, spoken Japanese (or whatever local Hogen is spoken) can very extremely from prefecture to prefecture. I learn more doing WaniKani than I do at work/home/day-to-day, even though I rarely use English anymore.


#17

It would be interesting to come up with a formula to calculate a “true WK level” based on SRS item distribution, where for example lots of apprentice or guru would lower the level, and all burned = level 60.


#18

Even after you burn everything, you will still regularly see kanji that you don’t know. At least I see a few everyday when I do reading, some are not even joyo or jinmeiyo. Learning never stops


#19

Wow, how did you manage to get through 8 years of academic instruction and study without at least the basic set of kanji? Didn’t you have to write kanji on blackboards and tests? Were all the professors just okay with kana?


#20

Yeah, I definitely feel I have a much better grasp on HOW to learn now. I had to learn how to learn before I did any actual learning. :stuck_out_tongue:

I can already read a lot better. I feel much better about my progress at this point.


#21

I’m just passed 120 days after reaching 60, 550 days since I started WK.

Right now I’m just keeping up with my reviews. It’s taken a while for my reviews to die down to under 100 per day on average per week.

Now it is all about the burns, and the SRS system kicking my butt by giving me burn stage reviews all day long. Currently up to level 46 on burning material.

But I can really take it easier now, do grammar and do other hobbies now that I’m not spending hours on lessons. :3


#22

Aah. That’s a fair point. To clarify, when I said “immersion” I meant immersion into language study. I should have been more specific. But you’re right. Relying on your environment alone to teach you the language is probably not very fruitful.


#23

You’re a legend


#24

Seeing the words and kanji “in the wild” sure helps cement them! So reading is the key! =D
Read read read! If you can’t already, study grammar and start reading even before you think you are ready. Just read it out loud, even if you don’t understand much of it yet (the act of reading out loud does help) And once you start grasping it you will feel amazing!


#25

I’ll echo your experience. I’ve been in Japan for 5 and a half years now and it wasn’t until I started doing WK that I really saw BIG gains in my reading ability. It started to transfer to my listening in my work environment. My wife is American so we speak English at home. At work, (I’m an English teacher) my students and coworkers prefer that I speak English with them though I find it now to be about 50/50 English and Japanese mix.

I thought that ‘immersion’ would have a greater impact on my language growth but the truth was that my gains were so slow that I thought I must have been too stupid to learn Japanese.

Started hitting the books and all that changed.

Hollywood lied to me! I didn’t just magically learn how to speak a foreign language in a 3 minute montage.


#26

Level 60 isn’t the end (nor do all Burned), but if I finish this, I am closer to the end. (True end is of course reading comprehension…)


#27

Hows your English reading ability doing?

Man, I should’ve taken past-me’s advice in this thread.


#28

I finished up my Master’s degree last winter so that kept pushing my English academic register. My wife took to reading classic British lit to keep her English fresh.


#29

Well I do always appreciate a woman who talks like she’s constantly in The Importance of Being Earnest.


closed #30

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