Kanji not displaying well on Linux Mint

http://imgur.com/a/NkgD7#0
Kanji
are not displaying properly on Linux Mint. :frowning: I have changed changed
fonts but there is always a group of kanji that does not display
properly. Especially high stroke kanji. :frowning: I have followed the advice
given on the other kanji on linux threads to no avail.

I’ve been using Linux for a few years now. 

- Which distribution you recommend?
If you never used Linux before, you should start with something simple. Ubuntu or Mint are very good for beginners. My personal recommendation is Xubuntu, which is Ubuntu with the Xfce-Desktop-Environment. Many distributions have a Live mode, which means you just put in the DVD (or USB-Stick) and the distribution starts. You can try things out without installing the distribution.

- Why do you use Linux?
It’s faster and has most of the things I need for everyday use. I also love the terminal.

Is it difficult to install?
I depends whether you have Windows on the same hdd or not. The installation itself is pretty easy. You need free space on your hard disk, since Linux needs its own partition (at least one).

- Games and Linux. Anything I should know?
These two don’t go along pretty well. Some Indie-games work under Linux (like Bastion or Don’t Starve), but big titles don’t work. If you’re into gaming, I’d recommend a dual-boot-system (You can choose which operating system you want to boot after starting the PC)

- Is Linux faster than Windows (Vista, 7 or 8)
For me it’s faster. Moreover, it doesn’t tend to slow down after a few months of use like Windows does.

 



Stalk said... I've been using Linux for a few years now. 
- Which distribution you recommend?
If you never used Linux before, you should start with something simple. Ubuntu or Mint are very good for beginners. My personal recommendation is Xubuntu, which is Ubuntu with the Xfce-Desktop-Environment. Many distributions have a Live mode, which means you just put in the DVD (or USB-Stick) and the distribution starts. You can try things out without installing the distribution.

- Why do you use Linux?
It's faster and has most of the things I need for everyday use. I also love the terminal.

Is it difficult to install?
I depends whether you have Windows on the same hdd or not. The installation itself is pretty easy. You need free space on your hard disk, since Linux needs its own partition (at least one).

- Games and Linux. Anything I should know?
These two don't go along pretty well. Some Indie-games work under Linux (like Bastion or Don't Starve), but big titles don't work. If you're into gaming, I'd recommend a dual-boot-system (You can choose which operating system you want to boot after starting the PC)

- Is Linux faster than Windows (Vista, 7 or 8)
For me it's faster. Moreover, it doesn't tend to slow down after a few months of use like Windows does.

 



 Thanks, this clear out my doubts! One last question and probably a stupid one but assuming you get a distro with Live mode (i.e. the OS in the DVD or USB stick). What happens if while you are running the distro, you remove the DVD/USB stick? Does the system crash or something?

Hmmm, never tried it. Worst thing that could happen is that your Computer restarts or shuts down. Since no data is  written to your hdd when using a Live-DVD, no data is lost or corrupted.
So: Try it :slight_smile:

I use Linux (Ubuntu ) simply because I don’t trust windows. and it’s free. I’m not very knowledgeable about it though as my brother installed it for me. installing things is a headache (for me) yet I still recommend it highly simply because it’s much safer than windows :stuck_out_tongue:

Juichiro said... I am considering installing Linux as a second operating system. My questions are?

- Which distribution you recommend?
Arch Linux is the one I use, and it is awesome. It's probably not good for beginners though. To start you could try Ubuntu which is very easy to install and use.


- Why do you use Linux?
There are many reasons, but mostly I think it's a better OS period.


- Is it difficult to install?
Depends on the distro. Ubuntu is easy, Gentoo is not.


- Games and Linux. Anything I should know?
What Stalk said is mostly true, but there are some other things you should know.
Some games have a Linux version. These you can usually just install and play.
For Windows games that don't have a Linux version, you usually have three options:
1) Try with Wine.  Wine is a compatibility layer that you can install to use Windows programs in Linux. Basically, it lets you run .exe files, which Linux can not normally run. Wine is not perfect but you'd be surprised with how far it has come. Here you can check if a certain game or program is compatible: http://appdb.winehq.org/
As you can see, games like World of Warcraft run flawlessly on Linux with Wine.
2) Use a Windows virtual machine. This involves installing Windows inside Linux, and using that Windows installation for stuff you can't do with Linux for any reason.
This provides a pretty good compatibility for non hardware-accelerated stuff (i.e., most non-3D stuff). But since you would be running Windows on a virtual machine, the performace would't be as good.
3) Dual boot Windows and Linux. This is probably what you were planning anyway. Ubuntu makes this really easy, too. You can easily choose when installing how much space of your HDD you want to leave for Windows, and how much for Ubuntu. Then, when you turn on your PC you will be greeted with a menu to choose if you want to start Windows or Ubuntu. So even if you install Linux, you can still keep Windows and use it for whatever you can't use Linux for. It's kind of bothersome because you have to restart your computer to switch OS, though.


- Is Linux faster than Windows (Vista, 7 or 8)
Well, this is a very broad question. But mostly... hell yes it is.
Keep in mind, if you try a live-CD version of Linux, it will be a bit slower than usual since it'd be running from a CD.
Stalk said... Hmmm, never tried it. Worst thing that could happen is that your Computer restarts or shuts down. Since no data is  written to your hdd when using a Live-DVD, no data is lost or corrupted.
So: Try it :)
 :O So if I work on a Word Document and I want to save it, where does it get saved?

I’ve been using Linux since ~2001 or so, Gentoo Linux since 2003.

- Which distribution you recommend?
Mint is probably a good choice (Ubuntu has been… going downhill as of late). I say download the Cinnamon, MATE, Xfce, and KDE versions, try them all and pick whatever desktop environment you like best (personally I like KDE).

- Why do you use Linux?
I’ve been using the same installation (!) of Gentoo on my main home computer for the past 9 years, kept it up to date and speedy, and moved it through several physical computers. Try doing that with Windows.

I’m also a developer and often patch my OS to some extent. I greatly enjoy being able to find out how things work (and make them work if they don’t). With Windows you’re stuck with a black box more often than not.

- Is it difficult to install? 
The typical distros (Mint, Ubuntu) are (much) easier to install than Windows. Gentoo is probably not a good choice for a beginner :slight_smile:

Hardware is pretty binary on Linux - the vast majority of it will work out of the box (no drivers to install), while bleeding-edge hardware may have trouble (and you won’t find drivers until they come into existence, because manufacturers rarely provide them). Chances are everything or almost everything will work out of the box, though.

Edit: the one exception is probably graphics drivers. If you have an Intel card, chances are you’re all set out of the box (they have the best Linux drivers and they’re open source). If you have an Nvidia or an AMD card you may have to install proprietary drivers to get good gaming performance. If you need do so, look for an up to date article on how to do it specific to Linux Mint, as there’s lots of old, outdated, or poor and generic tutorials out there. It should be as simple as running a few apt-get commands and never involve manually downloading and installing anything.

Edit 2: Looks like it’s all nice and easy on Mint these days and you can just select a driver using Driver manager.

- Games and Linux. Anything I should know?
The selection of big titles is limited, though these days there’s Steam for Linux with a growing selection of available games. Also, pretty much every game in the Humble Bundles to date is available for Linux.

http://store.steampowered.com/browse/linux/

And you can run quite a few Windows games on Linux using Wine.

- Is Linux faster than Windows (Vista, 7 or 8)
That question is very ill-defined and hard to answer. The OS typically makes no difference for, say, apps that spend most of their time calculating stuff. The Linux kernel itself is typically faster than the Windows kernel at similar tasks. But for the average user, what matters usually is the “slows down over time” property of Windows (caused by junk piling up in places that affect the system globally) that doesn’t really affect Linux, since Linux package management is miles ahead of Windows and rarely does “junk” accumulate.

Thanks, this clear out my doubts! One last question and probably a stupid one but assuming you get a distro with Live mode (i.e. the OS in the DVD or USB stick). What happens if while you are running the distro, you remove the DVD/USB stick? Does the system crash or something?
It won’t let you remove the DVD (it locks the disc tray while it’s in use and the eject button won’t do anything) :slight_smile:
If you remove the USB stick, the system will slowly crash in amusing ways (stuff in RAM will continue to run, anything that tries to access the drive will either hang forever or crash).

Live mode is useful for testing things out, but not a good idea long-term (especially DVDs, since they’re slow. Linux can be quite snappy when installed on a decent USB drive).

Note that there’s a distinction between a Live USB distro, which is like a Live DVD distro (the data on the drive is read-only, though there may be a separate section or “overlay” to save changes that you make), and a normal Linux install to a USB drive. The former is good for testing but you wouldn’t want to use it daily, because it’s still fundamentally meant to try the system out. The latter is just a standard installation that happens to be made on a USB drive and works just as well as an install to an internal HDD, just a bit slower.

To install Linux normally to a USB drive, boot from either a Live DVD or a Live USB (on a separate drive), use the installer, and simply tell it to install to your (target) USB drive.

 :O So if I work on a Word Document and I want to save it, where does it get saved?
Either RAM (it will be lost when you reboot) or, for some distros, a separate partition/overlay/some other trick on the USB drive. Using a Live DVD, then answer is almost always RAM unless you explicitly move it to your physical hard drive.

Live mode is meant to try things out, not for normal usage. For that, install the distro onto your hard drive as usual :slight_smile:

I’ve been using linux on and off for probably the past 6 or 7 years. My distro of choice is arch, but if you’re a beginner definitely start with ubuntu or one of the derivatives such as mint or elementaryos. 

As the others have mentioned there are options for gaming on linux, but seriously don’t get your hopes up yet. There has been two major problems holding back linux as a gaming platform: graphics drivers, and getting the games ported. With steam and the humble bundles more games than ever are getting ported to linux, but graphics drivers are still largely behind windows, especially for AMD graphics cards. If your AMD card is more than a few years old and considered “legacy”, proper support under linux is difficult. On top of that AMD cards don’t play very nice with wine. If you have an nvidia card (or a recent intel) your driver experience will probably be a lot better. Getting games to work under wine can be a pain in the ass, use a tool like PlayOnLinux to manage wine for you. Or better yet, just play your games under windows… you’ll save a lot of time and frustration and they’ll run better.

That being said, outside of gaming (which I’m sure will catch up sometime) linux is a superior operating system in just about every conceivable way… once you get your head around the idea of “package managers” and the terminal maintaining your OS is much nicer than windows. My favorite thing about linux is that most programs will have command line access, which allows you to combine and chain programs together in ways that will probably blow your mind, and save you a lot of time. Learn a scripting language like python or ruby and the possibilities grow exponentially. I remember watching this video a few years back that really blew me away: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EaVW3qJQYHc
This kind of stuff isn’t impossible on windows, it’s just a lot more painful.

Some recommended programs:
PlayOnLinux - Manages wine versions and has scripts to help install and optimize certain games.
pianobar - A command line client for Pandora radio
Sublime Text 2 - powerful cross platform text editor
mplayer - command line video player, this thing will play anything and there are gui front ends for it
transmission - bit torrent client
ibus+mozc - the open source implementation of google’s japanese IME
rvm+ruby - my scripting language of choice, and rvm is a tool that helps you install/manage versions of ruby

There will probably be times where you go “Oh I wish linux had (insert windows program here).” Check this site for alternatives: http://alternativeto.net/

jogu said...mplayer - command line video player, this thing will play anything and there are gui front ends for it
Actually, these days, you want to go for mplayer2 (it's a fork) or, even newer, mpv, especially if you watch anime (e.g. mplayer2 and mpv have proper support for MKV linked segments, while mplayer doesn't).
marcan said...
jogu said...mplayer - command line video player, this thing will play anything and there are gui front ends for it
Actually, these days, you want to go for mplayer2 (it's a fork) or, even newer, mpv, especially if you watch anime (e.g. mplayer2 and mpv have proper support for MKV linked segments, while mplayer doesn't).
 Good catch. I usually consume my media under windows (Pot Player is really nice). I probably did install mplayer2 last time I tried to switch to linux, but I forgot because it's still invoked via mplayer. I actually don't have a linux install atm, League of Legends and xfire (my friends wont switch to mumble) pretty much have me tied to windows for the time being. Though, most of my friends transferred over to the new oceanic LoL server, so pending how well I can get FFXIV to run under wine that might change!

Whatever you do don’t listen to anybody who says to start with Ubuntu. It made me hate Linux until I gave Arch a shot (Things actually work with a decent distro who knew)

If you’ve never played with dual booting Linux before then please use Mint. Ubuntu is cancer

Walnut said... Whatever you do don't listen to anybody who says to start with Ubuntu. It made me hate Linux until I gave Arch a shot (Things actually work with a decent distro who knew)

If you've never played with dual booting Linux before then please use Mint. Ubuntu is cancer
Linux mint is basically just ubuntu with mate or cinnamon installed by default. Perhaps you dislike unity?

Linux Mint Xfce is the bomb diggety. I’ve been using linux for years, I think it is the best operating system for watching anime! :D:D:D:D:DD:D:D:D:D

Darcinon said... Linux Mint Xfce is the bomb diggety. I've been using linux for years, I think it is the best operating system for watching anime! :D:D:D:D:DD:D:D:D:D
 ????
marcan said... I've been using Linux since ~2001 or so, Gentoo Linux since 2003.

- Which distribution you recommend?
Mint is probably a good choice (Ubuntu has been... going downhill as of late). I say download the Cinnamon, MATE, Xfce, and KDE versions, try them all and pick whatever desktop environment you like best (personally I like KDE).

- Why do you use Linux?
I've been using the same installation (!) of Gentoo on my main home computer for the past 9 years, kept it up to date and speedy, and moved it through several physical computers. Try doing that with Windows.

I'm also a developer and often patch my OS to some extent. I greatly enjoy being able to find out how things work (and make them work if they don't). With Windows you're stuck with a black box more often than not.

- Is it difficult to install? 
The typical distros (Mint, Ubuntu) are (much) easier to install than Windows. Gentoo is probably not a good choice for a beginner :-)

Hardware is pretty binary on Linux - the vast majority of it will work out of the box (no drivers to install), while bleeding-edge hardware may have trouble (and you won't find drivers until they come into existence, because manufacturers rarely provide them). Chances are everything or almost everything will work out of the box, though.

Edit: the one exception is probably graphics drivers. If you have an Intel card, chances are you're all set out of the box (they have the best Linux drivers and they're open source). If you have an Nvidia or an AMD card you may have to install proprietary drivers to get good gaming performance. If you need do so, look for an up to date article on how to do it specific to Linux Mint, as there's lots of old, outdated, or poor and generic tutorials out there. It should be as simple as running a few apt-get commands and never involve manually downloading and installing anything.

Edit 2: Looks like it's all nice and easy on Mint these days and you can just select a driver using Driver manager.

- Games and Linux. Anything I should know?
The selection of big titles is limited, though these days there's Steam for Linux with a growing selection of available games. Also, pretty much every game in the Humble Bundles to date is available for Linux.

http://store.steampowered.com/browse/linux/

And you can run quite a few Windows games on Linux using Wine.

- Is Linux faster than Windows (Vista, 7 or 8)
That question is very ill-defined and hard to answer. The OS typically makes no difference for, say, apps that spend most of their time calculating stuff. The Linux kernel itself is typically faster than the Windows kernel at similar tasks. But for the average user, what matters usually is the "slows down over time" property of Windows (caused by junk piling up in places that affect the system globally) that doesn't really affect Linux, since Linux package management is miles ahead of Windows and rarely does "junk" accumulate.

Thanks, this clear out my doubts! One last question and probably a stupid one but assuming you get a distro with Live mode (i.e. the OS in the DVD or USB stick). What happens if while you are running the distro, you remove the DVD/USB stick? Does the system crash or something?
It won't let you remove the DVD (it locks the disc tray while it's in use and the eject button won't do anything) :-)
If you remove the USB stick, the system will slowly crash in amusing ways (stuff in RAM will continue to run, anything that tries to access the drive will either hang forever or crash).

Live mode is useful for testing things out, but not a good idea long-term (especially DVDs, since they're slow. Linux can be quite snappy when installed on a decent USB drive).

Note that there's a distinction between a Live USB distro, which is like a Live DVD distro (the data on the drive is read-only, though there may be a separate section or "overlay" to save changes that you make), and a normal Linux install to a USB drive. The former is good for testing but you wouldn't want to use it daily, because it's still fundamentally meant to try the system out. The latter is just a standard installation that happens to be made on a USB drive and works just as well as an install to an internal HDD, just a bit slower.

To install Linux normally to a USB drive, boot from either a Live DVD or a Live USB (on a separate drive), use the installer, and simply tell it to install to your (target) USB drive.

 :O So if I work on a Word Document and I want to save it, where does it get saved?
Either RAM (it will be lost when you reboot) or, for some distros, a separate partition/overlay/some other trick on the USB drive. Using a Live DVD, then answer is almost always RAM unless you explicitly move it to your physical hard drive.

Live mode is meant to try things out, not for normal usage. For that, install the distro onto your hard drive as usual :)
 Mint vs Ubuntu. Which one would you choose? Just to mention that all I use my computer is documents and web browsing.
Walnut said... Whatever you do don't listen to anybody who says to start with Ubuntu. It made me hate Linux until I gave Arch a shot (Things actually work with a decent distro who knew)

If you've never played with dual booting Linux before then please use Mint. Ubuntu is cancer
 lol can you be more specific?

I think I will install Linux Mint Olivia. Any thoughts?

 

Apraxas said...  ![](upload://jGHNTT6U2CsAWZQiCTthgB5247.jpg)
 What's the meaning of this, Apraxas? I don't see any polar bears here?