Kanji Composition: How are kanji structured? (video)

I decided to delve further into the categories of kanji composition before doing any more in-depth videos on individual kanji.

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Awesome video, thanks. I also liked the 人 one you did, I hope you keep at it because I find them very useful and interesting.

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Thank you for the interesting video! Is there a good online resource to check a Kanji’s history that you can recommend?

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Wiktionary usually has the bare minimum, if there was any funny business.

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Thank you for all that you do, Leebo!

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Thanks for the video. It’s clear. I’m looking forward to more videos like this one. Subscribed.

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Well done!

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Love that you uploaded the video right after the end of the game.

Thank you so much for sharing what you know

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Was aiming for before the game but you know how it goes.

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Really helpful video, thank you!

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If I could just make one suggestion, it would be to use a better microphone because your voice sounds slightly muffled.

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Well, I spent about $60 on the one I have, so I’m probably not going to spend much more on a different one for the time being (I don’t know what price range you are imagining), but as I said in an earlier topic, there are still probably things I can do to make what I have sound better. I’m just not good at making videos yet.

The ones I make where I just point my iPad at books and talk just use the iPad mic and are terrible for that reason, but I do spend a lot of time on the audio for the presentation style videos. It takes me a few hours to do all the recording and whatnot in Audacity, removing noise, cleaning up mistakes, etc… but obviously there’s some kind of problem with how I do the basic recording itself since it’s not great.

I’ve watched tutorials on audio recording, but I guess I should devote time between videos to it, since when I actually have a video to put out I often just want to get it out and not spend a lot of time getting to the bottom of this one thing that doesn’t stop the video from existing.

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No absolutely it’s a minor point. Since you already have a good mic, it’s likely something else and I’m not an audio expert either. Maybe too much noise reduction? The only thing I really know about audio recording is try to do it in a small, quiet room. And put your mouth very close to the mic.

But as I said, it’s a minor point and I really do enjoy the content and presentation.

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It could be as simple as the positioning of everything. Though I’ve generally heard that being about a foot away is best. But perhaps the way I have everything angled, that is effectively making the distance farther.

And honestly, the audio always sounds better to me in the raw Audacity recordings than in the resulting video, which goes through a few programs before it comes out, but maybe it’s just my imagination.

I do want to just make it better before my next video, which probably won’t be for a while because holidays.

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Yes, I’d start with microphone positioning. One foot away sounds a bit far. Basically, the closer you can get, the less room noise will get in. But the greater chance of popping. Also it depends on the microphone itself, as they have different characteristics. I’d do some experimentation.

I found this video which seem to explain mic placement pretty well. He recommends five inches as a starting point .

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Actually, I thought it sounded like you were sitting too far from the mic as well. I was even looking for subtitles so that I could understand you.

You’ll certainly want to check your specific mic’s documentation to find the suggested optimal distance rather than going with “generally heard”. For example, your standard hand-held mic should be held two fingers from your mouth - as in, you should only be able to fit two fingers between your mouth and the mic.

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I wouldn’t be surprised if the video processing was reducing the quality of the audio, it might be worth checking the export settings of your video editing programs. Lower bitrate audio has less high frequencies, which could make it sound muffled. MP3 audio with high compression also sounds muffled.

I just gave a listen on my laptop and it sounds clear to me. It could have more deeper tones, which are naturally picked up by speaking closer to the mic. That could just be my laptop speakers being low quality though. You could try recording a short test clip at different distances (maybe say the distance you’re at) and then run it through all your processing and see which distance has the best result, or if that’s even the problem.

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Thanks for the thoughts.

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Okay, I tried what you recommended, tell me if this sounds better. It’s an unlisted video just to test the audio.

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It sounds a lot better to me! There’s more bass, and it does sound like you moved closer.

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