Kanji are getting harder

Quite impressive that you just created this post around 2 hours ago and you already got this many comments ! The WaniKani community is very active.

I got to level 2 a few days ago. I don’t have any feedback on your question, yet. However, I find your post insightful ! Hope to catch up soon !

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I totally second this! :slight_smile:
My weapon of choice and personal recommendation is pencil and paper.

It really helped me with the horizontal strokes in kanji like 達 and 遅.

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I’m glad I found this topic, I just got to level 6 and started around the same time as you so I would say you are doing great! Congrats for not giving up and going quite fast (in my opinion, at least ^^)

Reading about your worrying first stressed me a bit but the comforting answers you received kind of soothed me, and I will be expecting some sort of high “step” at level 9.

I think for this kind of learning, the most important part is to acknowledge you know more every day even though you don’t see it. Nothing is “useless” here, we are always learning or getting better at what we already learned.

がんばりましょう!

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I try my best.

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Honestly it becomes pretty natural, don’t worry too much. You’ll notice yourself finding it easier as you carry on

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It won’t solve everything, but I recommend this userscript. Though it’s rough around the edges, it has greatly helped me. Being able to recognize the squished kanji instead of simply looking at their radicals helps you distinguish between them more easily.

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They’re gonna contain more radicals as you go through, but more complicated doesn’t actually seem to make them more difficult to memorize, in my experience. The main issue is that some of them look very similar to each other. When you’re getting two confused for each other I’d recommend writing them down next to each other and remembering which radicals are different. How do you usually memorize kanji? If you’ve been mainly going on how they sort of look like (instead of remembering the radicals) it’ll definitely get harder over time.

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Absolutely, once you’ve memorized a lot of kanji it becomes easier to memorize them. Same goes for vocab.

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yhea this is a great idea. i think that from now on i will start writing kanji on paper. i think that drawing their shape and learning their stroke order might help.

well i usually go with radicals till they stick in my head and i don’t need them anymore. i do some exception for the more peculiars kanji like 美 or 花 or for the one that i already know like 買.

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oh i’m glad i’m not the only one then. thanks for your encouragement. tbh my accuracy hasn’t dropped that much but if fear it might happen.

oh and this is really helpful, thanks.

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what it does ?

Always a little intimidating to see warnings from people just a couple levels ahead of me… :sweat_smile:

Fwiw if you’re having trouble getting things to stick I think that the self-study script ([Userscript] Self-Study Quiz) is pretty great for getting extra practice. Also for me at least reading things (e.g. on NHK Easy) and seeing the kanji used in actual writing helps memorization a lot

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May I ask how you cope with the review-wall that builds up so quickly? If I don`t open WK for a day, I find myself with 200 reviews which may take over an hour to clear and frankly, I lose concentration and motivation. Sorry if this is the wrong thread for the question, but I identify with your situation because I too work a lot for uni and so don’t find the time every day. So yeah, what do you do about the massive review-wall?

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Well I started 5 days after you and I just reached level 8…

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yes, there is no better way to learn kanji than actually read them in a real life scenario. i plan to start native material reading very soon, maybe after level ten and after i finish japanese from zero 3 (and Genki 1)

oh don’t tell me. is 8 in the morning to me and wanikani greeted me with a pile of 150 reviews. there is no trick other than consistency. as i said above i have no work nor i’m studying, as such i have tons of free time to do reviews. now while this gave me a tons of problem in my real life i guess it helps with learning a language :sweat_smile:

btw la pasta é buonissima

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don’t worry about it. you aren’ t going slow at all. i just have tons of free time. when i said that i am not proceeding particularly fast i was comparing to my self, my free time and my overall feeling, not other people. i have no idea how fast other people are proceeding. sorry if i sounded arrogant by saying that or if you felt discouraged by it

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I dont quite get it xD Do the symbols imitate Kanji? “Top of the mountain”? :thinking: :innocent:

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Actually when I started I had no idea about how the SRS system worked. I would do reviews when I wanted to and liked to do lessons more than reviews. When I read about how it works (SRS system) the time I spent on a level decreased. First it was 1 month and some 30 days :fearful:, then it reduced to 20 days after I started doing my reviews when they were available, then 12 days when I actually implemented what @jprspereira had said here.

Oh no, I didn’t mean it like that. I just felt like saying it. I am sorry if I sounded rude. :blush:

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