I get the joke

Thanks to wanikani I can read this and get the joke.

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… I must be blind, what’s the joke?

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I can’t figure it out either :sweat_smile:

I’d translate the phrase as

From capital to capital.
Please reserve a flight from Tokyo to Washington DC.

Which seems quite normal…

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So far, I’m just reading it as a totally normal advert, same as you :smiley:

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Joke or not, 首都 is not even taught on WaniKani!

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So…I misread this. and it’s embarrassing. and I will try to figure out how to delete this.

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That’s ok, we all make meowstakes trunky_rolling

I hope this won’t discourage you from studying, but rather make you want to study even meowre! :cat2:

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So I can’t even delete it. I’ll will now crawl back under my review rock.

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You can always ask the @mods to delete it.

Anyway, as I’ve said, there is nothing shameful about making meowstakes – studying is all about making meowstakes and learning from them! :cat2:

Best of luck with your studies! :cat2:

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no deleting to the PITS! haha @trunklayer

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I was staring at this a for a good couple minutes trying to figure out why you would need to specifically register your luggage when going from Tokyo to Washington, before figuring out that it means flight instead of freight. Language is hard, katakana do not make it any easier.

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“Please book a flight” seems like it would be a bit on-the-nose for an English language advert, which would I think be more likely to extol the virtues of the destination or airline and leave the reader to reach the conclusion “hey, I should book a flight” for themselves. I dunno if Japanese advertising culture is just more direct like this or if this particular ad would feel clunky to a Japanese person too.

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Maybe it is totally normal and English speakers are just obsessed with being clever. Compensating for something maybe :thinking:

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Don’t feel bad, I forgot what 鳥肌 was the other day despite using it extensively but then I just drew a blank for no reason…I don’t get it. The shame never ends. DC is a bit of joke anyways so not half wrong plus I think most natives would prefer ANA or JAL whenever possible, good luck UA.

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It definitely felt quite clunky to me (but I’m no native speaker). I don’t think a direct phrase like 〜ください is often used in advertising. Especially for 予約, you would usually see it paired with 承ります or 承り中 in my experience.

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Mistakes are normal! No worries! I once mistakenly told a number of people that one of my children had died in Japanese (quite confidently I might add). The mistakes are endless! Don’t give up!

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Yeah, it feels kind of forced and way too direct.

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I’m not a native English speaker nor do I live in an English speaking country but wouldn’t something like “BOOK NOW!” be fairly normal and much more aggressive and direct?

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Idk, the all caps and quote thingies seam awfully clever to me :face_with_raised_eyebrow:

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You’re level 22, and you can read this. It’s impressive, never mind the mistake. I’ve been struggling with Japanese for years now and am still at absolute beginner level - I don’t get anything other than D.C.

That being said - what did you read, then? I’m a really curious person, and so I am interested in what the joke was, and what your mistake was :smiley: Care to share?

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