Explosion in loanwords over past 40 (okay, about 45) years?

No, it’s a word that only works for Australians who were watching The Simpsons back in 1994-95. Which, mind you, is 30 years ago. :stuck_out_tongue:

Oh, right. Yes, I can see how it might be read like that. This is why we need particles in English, because “kids” was apparently the topic of the sentence at the time. :stuck_out_tongue:

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As a Canadian, I have no idea which of these pronunciations are the British and which are the American :joy: “been” and “bean” rhyme to me, and “neither” and “either” are usually with the same “ee” sound as been…

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Fellow Canadian. In my part of the woods when I was still in Canada, although some people did pronounce been the same as bean, it was more common to hear it pronounced sounding like the name “Ben”.

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I learnt a few days ago why “criss-cross applesauce”, the American nickname for sitting cross-legged, makes some sense - because in Americanian, “cross” and “sauce” rhyme.

And it’s cute that they’re trying their hand at rhyming slang, but the point of rhyming slang is to make something easier to say. Leave out the “criss-cross” and just say “applesauce”.

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What do you say, sowse or something?

Isn’t the point that it’s silly nonsense for 3-year-olds to say?

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For me and I suspect also @Belthazar, “cross” has the COT vowel and “sauce” has the CAUGHT vowel, and we don’t have the cot-caught merger the way you do.

I pronounce cot and caught differently, but it’s hard to imagine cross with the cot vowel. I’ll have to search it up later.

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isn’t the point of rhyming slang to make things incomprehensible to cops

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But the criss-cross is the important part. We we learned this in kindergarten, it was to go along with sitting cross legged around the big circle. The criss and cross is what we were to do with our legs.

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Belth trying to get kids to sit cross legged in class:

Belth: “Applesauce”
Kids: stare blankly
Belth: “APPLESAUCE
Kids: exchange glances
Belth: “APPLE SAUUUUCEEEE”
Kids: begin moving backwards
Belth: AAAAAPLLE SAAAUCEEEEEE AAAAAAAAA
several kids start crying, one pees his pants

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I love applesauce. Especially if there is a nice thick pork chop under it.

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Yeah, but listen, we already have a phrase to get people to sit cross-legged. It’s “sit cross-legged”. There’s no need to involve pureed fruit at all.

(Though in my research as to the origin of all this criss-crossing, I learnt that apparently as recently as the 1990, “sit Indian-style” was more common, so in that regards, the applesauce is an improvement. I’ve also come across “walk Indian-file” in a book written lot too long ago, which is daft, considering the word “single” is right there. And is much more descriptive.)

(I also researched “kitty-corner” so I could rant about that too, and it apparently comes from the French “quatre”, because it describes the positions of the dots on the number-four face of a regular playing die, and this is getting too daft for words. “Diagonally” works perfectly fine.)

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My elementary school gym teacher had us do slow jumping jacks by yelling “PENCIL” and “TEEPEE” at us. I think that’s also been phased out

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BTW, in Polish sittin cross-legged is called “Turkish style” :wink:

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Indeterminate ‘them’, primary source of dad jokes since the 1100s.

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Very interesting! Anyhow, I believe the prior poster was correct as to the change to “criss-cross applesauce” being a way to try to be more inclusive. When I was in elementary school, well more than 45 years ago, the most common term used was the one that supposes all Native Americans would sit cross-legged, as opposed to people of other heritages, who supposedly didn’t?
So “criss-cross applesauce” is a huge improvement.
Or cross-legged.

I’d never thought to look up the etymology of catty-corner before, though. Thank you so much for that info, because the term makes more sense now! (I’ve never heard or said kitty-corner, though, just the catty-corner version. And that’s probably the only time I ever hear “catty”. If not referring to opposite corners, I’d say either “cat” or “kitty”.)

I recently bought this card game and played it with my tutor, and we had a heck of a (fun) time xD

I definitely recommend it.

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That does sound like fun! Did you just take turns describing the words or did you use any of the other game mechanics?

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It was SO fun. But also a hilarious struggle. We both screwed up several times. It’s really really hard to avoid certain words, haha.

We didn’t play a full game, but we tried our best to follow the game’s mechanics. But we also just picked randomly too. Any way you play it, it’s a blast.

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