Duolingo users - Are there any?

Can’t agree with you there. If I understood correctly that is. I got to decency in all the languages I learned only due to playing videogames. And some of them are way better for improving at a language than others. Language learning phone apps on the contraty seem to be of equally little use to me.

No you don’t really need anything. Just go here https://schools.duolingo.com/ make a “teacher” account, setup a classroom, change the settings for it to unlimited hearts and then join it.

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Thank you so much! This is exactly what I was wondering about. I learned a smattering of Japanese a few decades ago and picked up DL at the new year to try to make a serious habit of it. My curiosity about readings and articles led me to tofugu through google, and then on to WK. I had a feeling that DL was a nice complement for what WK leaves out (listening, grammar), but I had this nagging worry that it might actually be creating bad habits that I had a blind spot on. I know I’ll outgrow it at some point but it’s great peace of mind that it’s “fine”, even if it’s not great.

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I saw the word Duolingo and got PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress from Duolingo).

In all seriousness though, it’s terrible for learning languages, but as a supplement ig it’s better than nothing.

and better than rosetta stone. everything is better than rosetta stone.

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I tried Rosetta Stone before for Japanese. I couldn’t get very far in it. Japanese seems much too complicated of a language to just be thrown into without any explanations. I agree that even Duolingo is better, and it’s free lol.

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cant you just unsub from emails/notifications?

I quite like Duolingo, but I think it’s important not to think of it as the core of one’s learning; it’s just a useful and neatly packaged tool for knocking out a few practice sentences in short sessions.
I’d even go so far as to say that Duolingo isn’t a language-learning app so much as a language not-forgetting-so-much-so-fast app.

I particularly like that it makes me translate sentences that I haven’t seen before, in particular on the browser version where I can use keyboard input (although that does have the downside that there often aren’t enough possible translations in the database, so hitting ‘Enter’ always feels like a bit of a gamble).
I definitely like LingoDeer more than Duolingo for Japanese, but as I recall it would only ask me to translate sentences that I’d been rehearsing just moments before, which takes away the need to think actively about them.

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As a Duolingo user with a Plus account, and lifetime WK / Lingodeer, I’d say:

  1. Honestly, Duolingo sucks. A lot.

  2. If, like me, you struggle to do regular study, you may find Duolingo - despite not being a great language learning app - helps you get at least a little practice done every day.

  3. For languages other than Japanese, it’s not all that bad, I don’t regret installing it, and I’d certainly suggest people use it for e.g. French (as it does a better job of teaching grammar).

  4. I started learning (Japanese) because I was already using Duolingo for French, and they added the Japanese course as a “beta”. If I hadn’t, I might never have gotten around to actually learning it. I’m sure I’m not the only one, and the forums sometimes point people to other resources like Tae Kim, so think of Duo as a gateway :slight_smile:

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I think duo is meant for quick learning, so it doesn’t bother to provide vigorous explanation. I mostly rely on tips for each lesson and comments to understand the structure/grammar. I think duo it’s quite helpful to learn vocabulary and it’s context. in summary, WK provide the vocab learning, and duo to learn the context.