Do these long lines indicate thought?

Thank you in advance for any help :smile:

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I think the main purpose is to prevent very short lines standing on their own, the lines prevent the text from looking too ragged by making the line length roughly equal to the other short line next to it.

Of course it could also be for artistic impression or emphasis, that text has many single short line paragraphs, it is rather set like a poem than like a book.

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From the context of the content, it kind of looks like it’s the equivalent of a thought bubble. It seems to be what Ryouta is thinking upon seeing Kyoko. I doubt it’s a voiced statement.

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Sorry this is out of context but what book is this? I’ve been wanting to start reading for a while and this looks like a good starting point for me.

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I second this.

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Taishukan Japanese Readers Volume 1

Thank you!

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良太 looked up at 京子 and saw the hottest chick who ever even noticed his existence. He fell madly in love, and the author had to do something to place emphasis on his wild revelation. Bro was stricken.

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Thank you! It does happen again in the book and it’s definitely either emphasis or a thought bubble :smile:

That’s what I was thinking, too, thank you! :smile:

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Yes, it’s the level one book “The Ship” and they also have audio of it being read aloud. It’s very helpful!

:joy: That’s true!