"Dad of Light"


#1

Thanks to the recent Wanikani blog, I’ve started watching “Dad of Light” on Netflix.

I watch each episode first with Japanese subtitles (closed captioning), and then I watch it again with English subtitles, so I can catch all the bits of the story I missed.

I think this is working for me — I’m able to follow most of the story most of the time, and catch quite a lot of the Japanese, especially with the closed captioning to help. And it’s definitely good practice for keeping up with natural speed. And, two episodes in, it’s a good show; makes me want to learn more.

It also, of course, makes me want to play FF XIV. :slight_smile: Which I realize is the main reason they produced the show. I don’t have time for that sort of thing, though… unless I can somehow count it as studying! Does anybody know whether it’s possible for us in the States to play on a Japanese server, and interact with all the good folks there in Japanese? (For this or any other popular MMO.)


#2

Guess I should have googled it. Woot! And it runs on Mac, even. I might have to try that! :slight_smile:


#3

Dad of Light got me back into playing FF14 again… Their sly marketing worked like a charm and I can’t even be mad about it because it was so cute and well done. Wish the son told his Dad… but I think they both knew in the end and that kind of let sleeping dogs lie mentality seemed very Japanese to me. Loved the show.


#4

Do you play on a Japanese server? How’s that work out for you?


#5

I play on an EN server because my husband has zero Japanese speaking ability and wants to play together. The show sucked him back in too! But I did change the audio to Japanese and like picking up the differences between the English translation and what the actual Japanese dialogue says. I’m interested in translation work so the subtle differences are interesting to me and I try to think how I would have translated it instead. It’s not much, granted, but I think playing on a Japanese server would definitely be interesting! Maybe have a few phrases ready if you play with Japanese players to just politely explain that you’re a ‘foreigner’ and working on your Japanese. You might even make more friends that way because some of them might want to practice their English with you.


#6

Ah, you’re lucky that your spouse plays with you — I think there’s zero chance I could talk mine into it. She’s just not a gamer. And honestly I’m not sure I have time for it either… though it’s appeals to my “Type A” personality to be playing and studying at the same time. (And hey, maybe I could do it while walking on the treadmill as well — bonus points!)

If I do try it, though, I’ll post here with server info in case anybody wants to join me!


#7

Gaming is one of the things that brought us together :smiley:We spent our first date talking about Skyrim for 4 hours. Usually though we have different tastes in games so for us Final Fantasy 14 was the perfect mix. There’s so much to do that we can both do our own thing and play together when we have time. I’m curious about your experience on an all JP server. If you decide to do it please let us know how it goes!


#8

I took the plunge and picked up a used 1st-generation PS4 at GameStop for $180. The game itself was only $25, and a year of PlayStation+ was also available for $30. (And apparently, unlike the PC version, there are no monthly or annual fees for the game beyond PlayStation+ itself.) So, a relative bargain.

Nine hours of installing updates later, the game now appears ready to play, but I have to work. :confused: Looking forward to trying it out at lunchtime though. I’m planning to join the Masamune server; it’s a popular (but not officially “congested”) one in Japan. Since my play time will usually be the wee hours of the morning in Japan, I don’t expect it will be too busy when I’m on anyway. (EDIT: Masamune was marked “Legacy” which scared me away, so I’m on Asura instead.)

If anybody else wants to join me… the more the merrier!


#9

Nice, I’ve been playing on a Japanese server for several years now. Definitely my favorite MMORPG and one of my favorite games of all time.

I find playing on Japanese servers way more enjoyable too.

Never heard about not needing to pay a subscription fee for the game on PS4 though, on the contrary, as far as I know, you don’t need a Playstation+ subscription but you do need to pay the subscription fee for the game itself.


#10

Well, it’s certainly possible the GameStop clerk was misinformed, but she seemed awfully knowledgeable to me. I got the impression this was a fairly recent change. Though your description matches what’s at SquareEnix. I guess I’ll find out in 30 days. :slight_smile:


#12

Just thought I’d follow up with my experiences so far on FFXIV.

I’ve been playing now for about two weeks. I started out in English the first day, then switched to doing one hour in English, one hour in Japanese (because, as I’m not even an experienced MMO player, I needed time to really understand the instructions or I would have been hopelessly lost). Now I’m playing almost exclusively in Japanese, only switching back to English now and then if I’m really confused about something.

Folks on my server (Asura) are very quiet — I’ve never seen a shout, and almost never see anybody talking. I suspect talking goes on privately in “LinkShells” (little invitation-only chat groups). So I made it my mission in the last couple of days to get invited to one of those. This was daunting — everybody seems so much more experienced than me, in FFXIV and of course in Japanese! I thought nobody would want to waste their time with me.

But today I had success: I used the Player Search feature to look for players in my area, found a level 20 Lalafell whose language settings (if I understood the UI correctly) seemed to indicate they spoke English, and then located them in the trading hall. I went up to them, bowed, and asked (in English) if they had a moment to help a newbie.

I got no response, so I waited a bit, and tried again in Japanese. Still no reply, so I sat down and waited, figuring he was probably just away from his keyboard.

A few minutes later, he greeted me — in Japanese! And we struck up a conversation. I understood about 90% of what he said, and he seemed to understand my Japanese just fine (though I was probably making mistakes). He ended up inviting me to his “Enjoy Mornings” LinkShell (quite appropriate since when I play on my lunch hour, it’s morning in Japan), and introduced me to his comrades (よろしくね!). Then he invited me to join his party, and after some fumbling around (I’d never done a party before and had trouble figuring out how to accept), we went off and hunted some beasties that were causing trouble for Gridania — all in Japanese.

I can’t describe how thrilling it was to have this success. This guy and his friends welcomed me into their group and were patient as I struggled to figure things out. But moreover, I was actually communicating in Japanese, with the brain kicked into high gear because I had to — it felt very much like my six weeks in Japan, the feeling you get at the コンビニ cash register with a line behind you. A bit of pressure does wonders.

Ever since I got back, I’ve been missing Japan and especially missing the high-intensity learning that comes with immersion. I think I’ve finally found a decent substitute. I can’t go to Japan that often, but I can go to Eorzea every day!

P.S. If anybody cares, I’m going to try to blog briefly about my adventures — in both English and Japanese — here.