Color Coding: why does pink mean both "Kanji" and "Apprentice"?

What relationship could there be? All kanji are pink, but they obviously move through all the stages.

Your question is an interesting one, and I remember thinking about it at the time I became aware of the color difference. What colors I see are highly subjective – colorblind people don’t know what they’re missing until someone points it out to them (as in, “wait, you’re saying my shirt is PINK??”).

Like most colorblind people, my deficit is red-green, but “blindness” isn’t really an accurate term, it’s better to think of it as a deficit in color differentiation. I can see any color (as far as I am aware), if it is big enough. I can differentiate between the WK colors on my big computer screen if I pay attention to them; it would be more difficult if I used my phone, but I don’t do that anyway.

I believe what happened, in my case, is that because I don’t trust in my ability to see colors, over time my brain assigns less weight to their importance. It simply hadn’t occurred to me that the background color meant anything until I happened to read it in a forum discussion. So, in answer to your question, I’m not sure if customizing the colors would make that much difference. Hope that makes sense.

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Thanks for the interesting insight.

Especially this part as I think colors are quite often used in daily life for sending associations or subconcious messages e.g. in movies as some form of short-hand. So part of the message would just be omitted; I’m wondering wether you could compare that to loosing the tone of voice in written conversation.

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Pretty sure they are both \definecolor{kanji}{rgb}{1, 0, 0.66}\color{kanji}\small\textsf{#FF00AA}?

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Kumirei has it: If you do a color check with PS, you’ll see that they’re exactly the same.

Aren’t the colored boxes themselves all gradient, though? Darker in the top-left corner and lighter in the bottom-right.

Sure, but the same holds for the kanji elements

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Sorry, a bit offtopic, but I’m just curious why did you use such an elaborate way to make text colorful instead of \color{#FF00AA}\text{a simpler way like this?}

Right. They’re shades of the same color. If you use the Photoshop dropper, you can easily verify this.

By the way, I don’t want to come across as too critical. This site is, on the whole, a wonder: this is one of my few issues.

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I defined the color in case I wanted to use it again. I used \small so that the text would be approximately the right size, and \textsf to get rid of the serifs

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I see, thank you!

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I’m not arguing with you. I’m saying that they are literally the same color

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Ha — no we’re not arguing; we’re agreeing.

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That’s because an apprentice studies kanji. A master studies paticles.
I’m sorry if you were hoping for a serious answer.

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So, then, is there a script or something to customise colours…?

You could download breeze dark and adapt the colours for kanji, radicals and vocab independently?

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Good idea, and I tried it out and looked at the code etc, but it seems a bit complicated for me. :face_with_raised_eyebrow:

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