Biggest Realizations / Mind Blows You've Experienced Learning Japanese: Emoji means what?!?!

Thank you – the above describes my engagement with ている completely. Thank you so so much for helping me!! :grinning:

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The word for “calf” (as in the back of the lower part of your leg) in Japanese is ふくらはぎ. This was always hard for me to remember, but then I learned the kanji.

脹脛

脹 means “swell” or “bulge” similarly to 膨, and they can both be used in the verb ふくらむ. And はぎ is the lower half of leg. So calf is “lower leg bulge.”

Much easier to remember now.

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Nah, I’ll just call it a 子牛 and be done with it.

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After reading your posts I already forgot what Leebo’s word was

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god i both love and hate that first image so much, thanks for bringing it into my life

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雷【 かみなり】(Thunder)=神鳴り(God’s roar)

湖 (lake )= みず + うみ = freshwater sea

mindblown-rs

There’s so many kunyomi that make more sense now.

Have to get on reading this thread, how didi I miss it:

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OMG I never realised !!!
Thx for the revelation

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Just wait until you find out that the Japanese to this day honor the 神の道 by having tons of paperwork. They really do love their 紙

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I laughed so hard at that one

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According to a show I’m watching, saying things like スマホ、どっか行った or スマホ、どこ行ったか知ってる? when you can’t find something is something that people do in Kansai, but not in Kantou.

It made sense to me when I heard people saying it here, so I didn’t expect to hear that people in Kantou would think it’s weird. Apparently they just say something like スマホなくした and think that saying the phone “went somewhere” is strange because it’s like it’s a person.

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Funny, because it is illogical, but you can say similar phrases in English and not be looked at weird. In Dutch you wouldn’t say it like that, either, though.

I don’t know, “waar is die XXX nou weer naartoe” is definitely a pretty common phrase and does imply movement in the same way “where’d the XXX go” does, so I don’t think it’s entirely fair to say you wouldn’t say it like that in Dutch. Might also be a regional thing though.

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Oh yeah, I was thinking of literally using the verb ‘gaan’, only :sweat_smile:

Learning 楓 (かえで) was a minor mind blowing experience. I had just finished Stein’s;Gate Zero and one of Mayuri’s friends is called Kaede.

seem really weird to me. But again I don’t speak Dutsch so it could explain why. If I had to try…

waar is die = where is the
XXX = XXX :smirk:
nou weer = nowhere
naartoe = near the toe.

Is my Dutsch good?
sorry If that was offensive

This is more like ‘now again’. (Also those XXX’s gave me some weird ideas as well, one X would have sufficed :joy: )

It’s along the lines of “where’d that thing go this time”, but I like your translation just fine :joy:

I… see what you mean. Oh well, too late to go back now!

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I just encountered 左様なら - さようなら - in kanji for the first time, and it means something like “when it is the state of separating” :exploding_head:

omg it all makes sense :dizzy_face:

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Where did you see it has something to do with separating when broken into the parts? I believe it’s just 左様 “like this”, “the way things are” etc… So 左様なら is like “if it has to be like this”.

The 左 is ateji, btw, if that’s what you were thinking of. It was originally 然様 (still read as さよう).

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OMG hahaha I was thinking of 差 instead of 左 when I wrote this :woman_facepalming:
Well, (almost) the same lower part does not yield the same meaning… sorry for the confusion!

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