ゆるキャン△ Vol. 5 🏕

This week’s chapter is only the first half of episode three.


Rin starts by reserving a campsite for the night - she’s at Nagisaen Camping Ground on Bentenjima - and actually, I already noticed this place a few volumes ago when I was looking for the location of the panel that showed where Nadeshiko used to live (it’s on the same island).

Then she goes to see the sea, parking in the Maisaka Omotehama Parking Lot (here is a shot of the parking costs sign by the entry way, uploaded just last November). I… probably don’t need to point out the location of the Hamano Oohashi from there.

She then uses the onsen at Kaishunro (though labelled Bentenro here), then stands on the waterfront about… here-ish? to watch the sunset.

Next day, Rin heads to Kanzanji Onsen, and in particular Shizubana. Don’t entirely know if the numbered tickets are real - in this video (which I’ve linked before - still has spoilers for next chapter, so if you don’t want to see, stop watching at 2:38, when she gets back in her car) she visits the place, but mentions only that there aren’t tickets because it’s a weekday. (And having seen this town on Google Maps, I wanna visit now. Ride that ropeway.)

On page 105, Nadeshiko is shown buying daibanyaki from Fujita, just across the road from Kiga Station. Internet research suggests that Kiga Station is the best place for her to transfer from a bus to the train - that train line actually starts in Hamamatsu (same place as the bus), but then goes so far out of the way that the bus is somewhat faster. But why change to the train?

Because Nadeshiko and Rin meet up at Hamanako-Sakume Station, three stops later on the same line. The birds are real.

(That said, she could have stayed on the same bus to get here. Or caught the train from Kakegawa Station. Guess she just wanted the daibanyaki.)


Page 99, in the anime, Nadeshiko’s sister makes a point of asking if she’s got her mobile phone, which is an amusing callback to the first chapter.

Page 104, I want to know what on earth all those people needed with fifty packets of daifuku. Are they hosting their entire extended families? All of them? Or running a re-selling black market on the side?

Page 105, I rather thought the shop attendant was a woman, but in the anime, it’s a man. (He kinda has an afro… I wonder if he’s meant to be Afro.)


Proper nouns:
Page 89:
竜洋=りゅうよう (in Rin’s little aside comment - it’s where she camped last chapter)

Page 90:
浜松=はままつ
奥浜名湖=おくはまなこ
浜松市舞阪表浜=はままつしまいさかおもてはま (written on the car park sign)

Page 91:
浜名大橋=はまなおおはし

Page 99:
(浜名湖)佐久米=(はまなこ)さうめ (full name appears on sign on page 108)
舘山寺=かんざんじ

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omg birb! :durtle_love: I love seagulls, they can get really annoying but whenever I hear them it feels like I’m at home. aaah I’m gonna cry

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Last (non bonus) chapter. I have to get my hands on the next volume. Again.

28 - 改めて思ったこと

Start date: January 30th

  • I’m reading along :books:
  • I’m taking my time :camping:
  • I’m dropping out :no_good_man: :no_good_woman:

0 voters

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This week’s chapter is the second half of anime episode three.

The eel restaurant they visit is Sakume, right behind Hamanako-Sakume Station.

The railway crossing shown in the last panel of page 123 is here. Grandma’s house is located at the empty plot of land here - you can see the hedge of the place next door in the manga, but in the anime, the house much more strongly resembles the real building, and that little protrusion on the shoreline is shown too.

Not a location, but if you want to try that うなうなパイ, you can buy some here (the real stuff is unsurprisingly called うなぎパイ instead - Wikipedia says it contains eel extract, but doesn’t taste of eel).

The lookout platform they visit starting page 135 is here, and before doing this research, I genuinely thought it was on the waterline somewhere


Page 117, I kinda think Rin’s eyes popping out of her head is a lot more cartoonish than it typical for this series, and I kinda found it jarring. Even more so in the anime.

Page 121, heh, Rin’s tendency of using kanji for usually-kana words pops up again in the fourth panel.


Not really any new proper nouns this time, except for 土岐綾乃, which comes with furigana pre-installed.

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If 行って来る is the non-polite form of 行ってきます, what is the non-polite form of いってらっしゃい ? :thinking:

Someone smarter than me will correct me if I’m wrong, but I believe いってらっしゃい is made up of 行く and a contracted form of いっらしゃる. いっらしゃる is inherently “polite” though, so I’m not sure how you’d make it non-polite without changing the verb entirely.

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Technically, いらっしゃる is formal, rather than polite. The polite form is いらっしゃいます.

But yeah, it doesn’t really convert into “normal” language, per se. It’s basically become a set phrase that doesn’t particularly break down into components.

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Little late on catching up, but my reading schedule has gotten all kinds of messed up because I indulged myself with video games this past week…

Though somewhat on a related note, I’ve been digging quite a lot into the Sengoku period through documentaries and video games. What I’m only really now beginning to appreciate as I’ve read through Yuru Camp and looked at real life locations (particularly the observation deck) is just how much of Japan is forested mountain terrain. Reading Yuru Camp, studying Japanese history, and taking Google Map tours impress not only how winding and rugged the geography is, but how people have adapted to it.

Japan’s landscape is fascinatingly dense and doesn’t seem to have changed all that much outside of the coastal metropolitan areas. I can totally see how Rin could easily rely on the backroads to cover as much ground as she does.

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73% is mountains, 68.55% is forest. Finland and Sweden are the only developed nations with more forest, according to Wikipedia.

Forest Agricultural land Residential area Water surface, rivers, waterways Roads Wilderness Other
66.4% 12.8% 4.8% 3.6% 3.4% 0.7% 8.3%
251,000 km² (97,000 sq mi) 48,400 km² (18,700 sq mi) 18,100 km² (7,000 sq mi) 13,500 km² (5,200 sq mi) 13,000 km² (5,000 sq mi) 2,600 km² (1,000 sq mi) 31,300 km² (12,100 sq mi)

Frankly kind of astonished that roads cover a measurable percentage of Japan’s land area.

Side note, I meant to mention this earlier, but the circumference of Lake Hamana is 114km.

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And that’s it, friends. The end of an era volume.

番外編 - へやキャン△

Start date: February 6th

  • I’m reading along :books:
  • I’m taking my time :camping:
  • I’m dropping out :no_good_man: :no_good_woman:

0 voters

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Omake strips? How are we up to the omake strips already? We only just started this volume! Anyway, these strips generally appear as short skits at the ends of episodes (not all of them in the past - page 155’s strip was in this week’s episode), though some of them were in the Heya Camp miniseries.


Page 145: For the treehouses that Aki finds in Yamanashi Prefecture, a bit of Googling turned up this, this and this.

Page 149: The camping gear factory tour Nadeshiko finds is probably Snow Peak. Supporting evidence is this page about tours on their website, and this photo of their HQ. Page 150, if you want to try the うなぎパイ factory tour, it’s here.

Page 164: I doubt it’s the video that Aoi-chan found, but this is what professional slacklining looks like.


Page 147, yeah, I’ve always noticed that tent makers are quite optimistic about how many people can fit in their tents.

Page 157 Heh. “What’s?”

Page 174, the Yen Press version has rendered イヌーイング as “dogging”. A warning to all: do not, for the love of all that is good and holy, ever say that in the UK.

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I know! Also I’m half a volume late again
Speaking of which, @Radish8, are you still okay setting up the volume threads?

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Yep! Do you want the standard one-week break?

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I really liked the epic serious look in the top right panel of 154 :joy:

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For me a week would be fine, but we could make a poll and see how that turns out :+1:

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Standard is good for me!

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It might just be because i’m sleep deprived but the オーマイガッ!! on 158 really got me

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I just got to spend the day out in the snow around a fire cooking food, reading, and drinking tea. It was deeply satisfying.

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Hello, I am catching up with this volume :3

Question on ch. 26, p. 63
「カタカナのせいで一気に俗っぽく見えて来たぞ」
“Because of the katakana, it straight up looks tacky”
^ Did I understand it correctly? If so, why did Rin say this? Is there some kind of connotation with writing in or translating something into katakana?

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My books are packed away, and she doesn’t seem to deliver the line in the anime, but from memory what she’s commenting on is what it is that’s written in katakana (rather than the fact that it’s written in katakana). I.e. it’s already obviously an offertory box, but they’ve added the word “charity” to it (in katakana), which just makes it sound like they’re boasting about how charitable they are. Or something along those lines.

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