★ The SFF Project ★: [Conjunctions]


#1

The SFF Project:  (Anki + Memrise)

4/11/15 Update: The course should be much better now! I went through some animes, mangas, etc. and marked all the most conjunctions I could find, added alternate answers, removed a whole bunch of extra/unnecessary items, and more! Hopefully this helps out a bit! ^^
4/14/15 Update: JFRN has updated his course for us! On the Anki side of things, they will be updated soon! I've been buried 6 feet under homework as of late, and haven't had the chance to update them.
6/24/15 Update: Finished the .txt and .apkg files to match the base Memrise course content, and added some conjunctions I had in a list I've been building.


Have you ever read Japanese, and enctountered text which appeared to have no meaning at all? I'm talking about... conjunctions!
The definition of a 'conjunction' is "[...] a part of speech that connects words, sentences, phrases or clauses."
An example English conjunction would be 'but', or 'therefor', 'even so', etc. These aren't really 'words', as in nouns, adjectives, or verbs... but they're still there!

These things can really skewer your interpretation of a sentence, regardless of whether or not you know all the respective grammar and vocabulary.
Or at the least, you may not catch words like 'だから' (among others),  which means 'therefore', and mistake it for a 'word' and miss the sentence's nuance.
I knew there was something missing, and I knew they weren't nouns, adjectives, or verbs,  so I was pretty lost... Until I knew what I should've been studying!
If I knew about conjunctions early on, and started studying them alongside my other methods for learning, reading would be a lot easier and enjoyable for me.
If you think about it, how hard would it be for someone to read English without knowing what all these 'words' meant? They are all extremely important!

Take a look at this sentence: 「私が欲しかった物、だから、きっとあなたも欲しいよね!」ー I liked this, therefore I'm sure you'd like it too!
’だから’ in the sentence above is a conjunction - It might seem obvious that you should dedicate some of your study time to them, but have you?
I can guarantee that if you know all of these, a quick and correct understanding of even the most complicated sentences would become much easier.
If you're still confused, click on the link to get and idea of what I'm talking about:  [Lesson 50: Conjunctions]

Now you know you should study them... but how should you? WaniKani only provides Kanji to study!
First, download Anki:  [Anki]
Second, download the files below and double click them once they're done downloading
(If you don't want to use Anki, you can simply download the text (.txt) files and import them into any other SRS and learn them there - OR use Memrise)

And last but not least, don't forget to study!

がんばって、みんな!


Anki & (.txt) Downloads:

 1)[Full Conjunction List Download]  →   ~ 18KB
      → Text File Download: [All_Conjunctions.txt]  →   ~5KB
ーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーー   Optimized Decks:   ーーーーーーーーーーーー
2)The Tourist:  [Conjunctions (Solidity) Download]  →   ~12KB
       → Text File Download: [Solidity.txt]  →  ~2KB

3)The Enthusiast:  [Conjunctions (Fluidity) Download]  →   ~7KB
       → Text File Download: [Fluidity.txt]  →   ~2KB

4)The Conversationalist:  [Conjunctions (Fluency) Download]  →   ~6KB
       → Text File Download: [Fluency.txt]  →   ~1KB

       Special thanks to Looki for retrieving the original text for the decks; This wouldn't have been possible without him!


Memrise Courses:

For those that would rather use Memrise to learn all of this material, WK user & friend JFRN was nice enough to create us all a course! It's been updated now :)

☆★ JFRN's Links ★☆

http://www.memrise.com/course/582634/full-japanese-conjunctions/



For those who'd prefer to study the courses in chunks (or learn in an organized matter, etc), I've made courses for each of the three segments (S, F, & F

☆★ My Links ★☆

Memrise [Part 1/3] : http://www.memrise.com/course/606122/the-sff-project-solidity/

Memrise [Part 2/3] : http://www.memrise.com/course/606248/the-sff-project-fluidity/

Memrise [Part 3/3] : http://www.memrise.com/course/606254/the-sff-project-fluency/

The New And Improved List Of API and Third Party Apps
#2
GreenWarrior said...
An example English conjungtion would be 'a', or 'the' and so on. These aren't really 'words', as in nouns, adjectives, or verbs... but they're still there.

"a" and "The" are articles, "a" is the indefinite article and "the" is the definite article. They have no corrolary in Japanese. 

For , And, Nor, But , Or , Yet , So those are examples of the English conjunctions.

#3

Just as a side note, I figured I’d post this in 3rd party apps as I’ll be adding an Anki deck later on. Not entirely sure if that’s correct, but hey.


#4
Syphus said...
GreenWarrior said...An example English conjungtion would be 'a', or 'the' and so on. These aren't really 'words', as in nouns, adjectives, or verbs... but they're still there.

"a" and "The" are articles, "a" is the indefinite article and "the" is the definite article. They have no corrolary in Japanese. 

For , And, Nor, But , Or , Yet , So those are examples of the English conjunctions.
You're right on that, I just wanted to give an example so people would see what I was referring to a little easier ^^'
Thank you for the corrections in any case :D

#5

i feel like they’re called something else, not conjunctions.

right, wikipedia-ed it:
In grammar, a conjunction (abbreviated conj or cnj) is a part of speech that connects words, sentencesphrases or clauses. A discourse connective is a conjunction joining sentences. This definition may overlap with that of other parts of speech, so what constitutes a “conjunction” must be defined for each language. In general, a conjunction is an invariable grammatical particle, and it may or may not stand between the items it conjoins.

so “the” and “a” aren’t conjunctions. i think they’re called articles.

…um yeah? i don’t really know what i was trying to get at because i lost my train of thought midway through reading the wikipedia article.


#6
ShotgunLagoon said... i feel like they're called something else, not conjunctions.

right, wikipedia-ed it:
In grammar, a conjunction (abbreviated conj or cnj) is a part of speech that connects words, sentencesphrases or clauses. A discourse connective is a conjunction joining sentences. This definition may overlap with that of other parts of speech, so what constitutes a "conjunction" must be defined for each language. In general, a conjunction is an invariable grammatical particle, and it may or may not stand between the items it conjoins.

so "the" and "a" aren't conjunctions. i think they're called articles.

...um yeah? i don't really know what i was trying to get at because i lost my train of thought midway through reading the wikipedia article.
 I fixed it ^-^'

I just hope people new to the language can see this and benefit from it, that's my main goal anyhow..


#7

There’s certainly a benefit to it, though there are a lot of them that are like “So” “So then” “Henceforth” “Whenceupon” and other such BS. It is just important to not think of them like articles. But that’s fixed anyway.


#8

haha i spent too long writing my response and you’d already fixed it. :stuck_out_tongue:


#9

きっと is an adverb.


#10
Gex said... きっと is an adverb.
 Thanks Gex :D

#11

Hmm, this is actually one of the biggest things that trip me up when reading. I can get an idea of each clause, but I don’t know how those clauses are connected. Looking forward to seeing where this goes!


#12

topic made me think you were talking about this


#13
kaichi said... topic made me think you were talking about this
 Oh wow, quite the coincidence xD

BTW I'll be posting the files over the weekend, I had a lot more homework than expected this week... sigh*
#teentroubles

#14

I’m still beginner but I can see what you’re referring to after I have read some of the “Japanese graded Readers” books which, I highly recommended for you. I came across many of these words while reading and some of them could make trouble when it feels like the sentence meaning has slightly changed. but, I found it really important to Emphasize, Exception and Support a meaning or even take a breath!

Thanks for the supported links



#15

Good stuff


#16

It’s ready! The more filtered versions will be released over the next week (high school homeworks a pain)
Hope you can enjoy!


#17

anyone know a way to convert this to a csv file to use in houhou??? i’m super interested.


#18
Saphrose said... anyone know a way to convert this to a csv file to use in houhou??? i'm super interested.
 Import into Anki and then re-export as CSV :)
An *.apkg file is just a zip that contains a collections.anki2 sqllite dump and a media directory (if the media was included)


#19

It’s ready for download! The next two links will be added later today… finally got some free time :smiley:


#20

If I may make a suggestion. I imported the large deck into Anki. Could you please unstack the cards with multiple words? Some have three or four words I don’t know, and I would rather learn them individually. Also, can you include hiragana on cards with kanji? Some of the kanji were unfamiliar and I had to look them up.

Great job! And really appreciated!